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B.C. Construction Boom Likely to Continue for Next Several Years

June 13, 2007

VANCOUVER – British Columbia’s construction sector is employing a record high number of people, and it isn’t going to decline anytime soon.

This and other forecast details were released today in The Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) third annual edition of Construction Looking Forward: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015 for British Columbia.

The forecast indicates that major construction projects will continue to flow into the province for the next couple of years, causing increased growth in construction employment and increased demand on the labour market. A decline in construction activity is forecasted for late 2009, which will ease labour markets back to a more manageable state, although they will remain above 2006 levels.

“The tight markets across Canada now and over the next few years compel industry and governments to target their efforts to ensure all potential workers, including Aboriginal peoples, women, youth, unemployed and underemployed workers and immigrant workers are part of a thoughtful and comprehensive solution,” says George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council.

The CSC developed Construction Looking Forward with input from BC’s Labour Market Information (LMI) committee that includes stakeholders from all sectors of the construction industry. The forecast is a tool to help industry stakeholders manage risk and plan for the future.

“This report is very important for the construction industry in British Columbia,” says Manley McLachlan, President of the British Columbia Construction Association. “By combining economic projections with the list of planned construction projects on the horizon, it gives industry stakeholders information to make knowledgeable decisions about their sector, the future and how they plan and manage risk for their businesses over the next several years.”

“The huge boom in construction right now in the province requires that we all ensure programs are in place to meet the increased demand for qualified workers who can continue to operate safely on our worksites,” says Wayne Peppard, Executive Director of the BC Yukon and Territory Building and Construction Trades Council.

M.J. Whitemarsh, CEO of Canadian Home Builders’ Association of British Columbia says, “The labour market information is critical for our planning as we continue to develop data that is more specific to our sector.”

Construction Looking Forward forecasts will be released for each province over the coming weeks.

A new feature to this year’s Construction Looking Forward allows stakeholders to perform customized data searches online. This tool will help individuals source out the exact data that is relevant to their needs.

The Construction Sector Council’s BC LMI Committee is a multi-stakeholder committee representing the key organizations for the construction sector in British Columbia. With funding support from HRSDC and Service Canada, the committee provides industry input into the forecast and also undertakes research projects that help the industry plan strategies to address current and future human resource challenges.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001 as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. The Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program provided funding for this project. The report is available on the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Tanya Volk
Karyo Edelman
(604)623-3007
tanya.volk@karyo-edelman.com

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552
sparks@csc-ca.org

INDUSTRY CONTACTS:
Manley McLachlan, President
BC Construction Association
(250) 475-1077

Wayne Peppard, Executive Director
BC Yukon and Territory Building and Construction Trades Council
(604) 291-9020

M.J. Whitemarsh, CEO
Canadian Home Builders’ Association of British Columbia
(604) 432-7112 

Reports Highlight Need for Immediate Training and Retention to Meet Atlantic Canada Future Construction Needs

June 13, 2007

HALIFAX – A new report released today assessing Atlantic Canada’s construction industry reveals the need for immediate attention to recruitment and retention to ensure a skilled workforce for upcoming projects.

The Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) third annual edition of ‘Construction Looking Forward: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015 for Atlantic Canada’ states that although the labour pool is currently stable, both employers and government have to adapt training and recruitment efforts to meet future demand.

“Atlantic Canada’s construction sector has enjoyed a relatively stable supply of workers for sometime now,” said Tim Flood, President of John Flood and Sons (1961) Ltd., and the Business Co-Chair of the CSC’s Board of Directors. “But this report raises the concern about the industry’s aging workforce where a lot of workers are expected to retire soon. The new entrants may fall short of the number needed to supply upcoming construction projects and our sector needs to change the way we attract new people to fulfill the coming demand.”

The CSC produced the forecast with input from all sectors of the construction industry and government through the region’s Labour Market Information (LMI) Committee. The forecast suggests that although the industry is plateauing right now, by 2011 there will be an upturn in housing construction in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island that may limit the availability of housing-related trades. Factors such as changing demographics in New Brunswick and a lagging population increase in Newfoundland further impact the size of the available construction workforce.

Steve Graves, President, Mainland Nova Scotia Building and Construction Trades and a CSC Board Director, stresses the significance of the forecast, “We need to put programs in place to meet the increased demand that’s coming for qualified workers who can continue to operate safely on our worksites.”

Construction Looking Forward forecasts will be released for each province over the coming weeks. George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the CSC says, “The tight markets across Canada compel industry and governments to target their efforts to ensure all potential workers, including Aboriginal peoples, women, youth, unemployed and underemployed workers and immigrant workers are all part of a thoughtful and comprehensive solution.”

The Construction Looking Forward base case report did not include a number of major projects due to their uncertainty. However, their realization could create significant challenges for the construction industry in the absence of strategic planning. In response, the Nova Scotia Department of Education funded the development of the Major Projects Investment Scenario to broaden its understanding of the potential impact these additional projects might have on the requirements for skilled trades workers in the Atlantic region.

The results of this further analysis are published under a separate report, “Atlantic Major Projects Investment Scenario: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015.” It reveals that at peak construction in 2010, an additional 10,600 construction workers will be required to meet the needs resulting from increased construction activity.

Over the forecast period, boilermakers, pipefitters, crane operators, construction millwrights, heavy equipment operators and welders show the largest increase in demand.

A new feature to this year’s Construction Looking Forward report allows stakeholders to perform customized data searches online. This tool will help individuals source out the exact data that is relevant to their particular needs.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001 as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. The Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program provided funding for this project. The report is available on the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

MORE INFORMATION:
Carol McCulloch, President
Construction Association of Nova Scotia
(902) 468-2267
cmacculloch@cans.ns.ca

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552
sparks@csc-ca.org

Report sheds light on future of construction in Saskatchewan

May 31, 2007

REGINA – A new construction forecast released today is giving Saskatchewan industry leaders a snapshot of what the future market holds and where they’ll be able to find their workforce.

The Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) third annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015 for Saskatchewan” sheds light on current labour market trends and offers projections for the future. By examining labour market trends from the recent past, the report offers insight on what the future challenges are in store for the industry.

"Although Saskatchewan is in the middle of a record building boom, we know that the future labour pool might not be large enough to satisfy that demand.” said Paul McLellan, President of Alliance Energy Ltd. and a member of the CSC’s Board of Directors. “The information in this forecast is invaluable for the Saskatchewan construction sector to be able to plan effectively for those fluctuations that are coming.” He highlights the importance of this document as a planning tool for the construction industry. “This forecast has been assembled with input from all segments of the construction industry. The information is reflective of the current situation in Saskatchewan, as well as what the future holds.”

The importance of this year’s forecast was echoed by Terry Parker, Business Manager of the Saskatchewan Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council. He says, "With the knowledge that there are going to be some upcoming demographic shifts in the workforce, we’re planning ahead now to recruit and train qualified replacements.”

The report notes that in addition to a shifting workforce, factors such as strong local economic conditions and extensive building activity in other provinces will impact the available workforce for Saskatchewan. It also states that recruiting for the industrial and engineering construction trades may prove to be the most challenging.

“We now know that there will be strong competition among the companies for the available skilled workforce,” said Bob Turczyn, Construction Supervisor at SaskPower. “With big projects coming down the pipe, resources are going to be limited and wQe will need to change the way we attract new workers to this industry, starting now.”

Paul Caton, Senior Market Analyst for Saskatchewan, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, cites the forecast as a helpful tool to help monitor labour market conditions. “The housing segment is going through an upswing right now, which is putting a strain on the available workforce for selected trades. The CSC’s outlook calls for conditions in the residential market to slow over the medium term to 2011 before growth resumes later in the forecast.”

A new feature to this year’s report allows stakeholders to perform customized data searches online. This tool will help individuals source out the exact data that is relevant to their particular segment’s needs.

Construction Looking Forward forecasts will be released for each province over the coming weeks.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001 as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. Funding for this project was provided by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. The report is available on the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

MORE INFORMATION:
Michael Fougere
Saskatchewan Construction Association
(306) 539-8454
michaelf@scaonline.ca

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552
sparks@csc-ca.org 

Canada's New Government announces agreement with Australia to benefit construction sector

January 25, 2007

OTTAWA – The Honourable Monte Solberg, Minister of Human Resources and Social Development, joined by the Australian High Commissioner, His Excellency William Fisher (left), and Mr. George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council (right), announce the new agreement between the Australian and Canadian construction industries.

OTTAWA, ONTARIO — The Honourable Monte Solberg, Minister of Human Resources and Social Development, and His Excellency William Fisher, Australian High Commissioner, today announced a partnership agreement between the Construction Sector Council of Canada (CSC) and the Australian Construction Industry Forum that will help to address labour market issues in the construction industry.

"This industry partnership is the first of its kind and Canada's New Government is pleased to provide support through funding to the Sector Council Program," said Minister Solberg. "The construction sector is an important contributor to the economy in both Canada and Australia and this agreement provides an excellent opportunity to tackle human resources challenges and get skilled tradespeople into both the Canadian and Australian work force, when and where they are needed."

The aim of the partnership agreement is to support and enhance each organization's ability to forecast construction investment activity, employment demand and supply in the residential and non-residential sectors. The agreement will enable the construction industry in both countries to share approaches and best practices in predicting labour needs and addressing skilled trade shortages

"This historic industry-led agreement is an example of the key role that innovative approaches can play in international labour market issues," said High Commissioner Fisher. "By sharing information, expertise and research, both economies will benefit."

The CSC's approach on predicting construction labour market needs and addressing skilled trades shortages, through its labour market forecasting model, will be shared with Australia. The two organizations will also explore opportunities to work collaboratively on areas of common interest.

"We are pleased to have the Government of Canada's support in developing and promoting our top-notch forecasting system," says Timothy Flood, Construction Sector Council Business Co-chair and President of John Flood and Sons Limited." The CSC's Construction Looking Forward forecasting reports are certainly a hit here, and we are proud of the international recognition they have gained."

"The ability to predict when and where 32 trades and occupations will be available over the next nine years provides a world-class model," said Neil Marshall, Chairman of the Australian Construction Industry Forum. "We are also impressed by the CSC's consultation process with industry leaders from each sector and region of the country, and with the research on labour market issues, such as the future of mobile workers."

The CSC was established in 2001 to address the work force needs of the construction industry by bringing together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical decisions. Funding for the CSC is being provided by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

Sector councils are designed to meet emerging skills requirements, address skills and labour shortages, and build essential skills in the workplace as a foundation for continuous learning. They are organizations that bring together governments, business, and labour and educational stakeholders in key sectors to share ideas, concerns, and perspectives about human resources and skills issues. Their goal is to find solutions that benefit the sector in a collective, collaborative, and sustained manner.
Sector councils play a vital role in helping to strengthen the Canadian labour market, thereby contributing to the productivity and competitiveness of the Canadian economy and the standard of living of all Canadians.

For more information (media only):
Lesley Harmer
Director of Communications
Office of the Honourable Monte Solberg
819-994-2482

Media Relations Office
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559

George Gritziotis
Executive Director
Construction Sector Council
613-569-5552

Peter Verwer
Chief Executive
Property Council of Australia
0407 463 842
02 9033 1920

Katie Martin
Australian High Commission
613-783-7608 

Construction Industry Forecasting Tool Goes Global

January 25, 2007

OTTAWA – Canada’s construction industry is going global by working with its Australian counterparts to share approaches on predicting construction labour needs and addressing skilled trade shortages.

“Both countries have dynamic construction industries that help drive their respective economies and we have a lot to learn from each other on how to keep doing that,” says Robert Blakely, Construction Sector Council (CSC) Labour Co-chair and Director of Canadian Affairs for the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL – CIO. The CSC is now in the third year of producing a construction labour requirements forecast, widely used by industry and government decision makers in Canada.

“While we each have booming construction markets, we are also dealing with similar human resources challenges,” he says, “such as skilled trade shortages and aging populations.”

“The CSC’s Construction Looking Forward reports are certainly a hit here and we are proud that our forecasting work is gaining international recognition,” says Timothy Flood, Construction Sector Council Business Co-chair and President of John Flood and Sons Ltd.

The aim of a recent agreement signed by the CSC and the Australian Construction Industry Forum (ACIF) is to “support and enhance each organization’s ability to forecast construction investment activity, employment demand and supply in the residential and non-residential sectors.”

“Innovative approaches to predicting labour requirements and developing targeted labour market solutions will be shared with a view to improving both industries,” says Peter Verwer, Chair of Australia’s Construction Forecasting Council (CFC) - www.cfc.acif.com.au.

Neil Marshall, Chairman of the Australian Construction Industry Forum, which oversees the CFC, is particularly interested in the level of detail in the CSC forecasts.

“The ability to predict when and where 32 trades and occupations will be available over the next nine years provides a world class model” says Marshall.

“We are also impressed by the CSC’s consultation process with industry leaders from each sector and region of the country, and with the research on labour market issues, such as the future of mobile workers,” says Mr. Marshall.

ACIF oversees and manages the Australian Construction Forecasting Council, and its mission is to create a competitive construction and property industry that is a leader in building a prosperous Australian nation. Membership is open to any Australian building or construction industry association with a national structure and focus.

The CSC is a partnership between business, labour and government with financial support from both industry and government. Established in 2001 to address the workforce needs of the construction industry, the CSC brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical decisions.

Funding for the CSC is being provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

For more information on this and other CSC programs visit www.csc-ca.org.

Synopsis
The Construction Sector Council’s Construction Looking Forward forecast reports, which are valued as a planning tool by decision makers in the Canadian construction industry, have gained international recognition. The CSC has recently signed an agreement with its Australian counterparts to share information on labour forecasting and recruitment practices. The agreement with the Australian Construction Industry Forum will see each country share best practices to refine forecasting abilities and improve solutions to human resource challenges in the construction industry.

For further comment:
Peter Verwer
Chief Executive
Property Council of Australia
0407 463 842
02 9033 1920

George Gritziotis
Executive Director
Construction Sector Council
613-569-5552 

Australia and Canada sign agreement that will benefit both Economies

January 5, 2007

CANBERRA – Australia’s construction industry is going global by working with its Canadian counterparts to share approaches on predicting construction labour needs and addressing skilled trade shortages. The move will benefit the Australian and Canadian economies and has been welcomed by the Governments of both countries.

“Innovative approaches to predicting labour requirements and developing targeted labour market solutions will be shared with a view to improving both industries,” said Peter Verwer, Chair of Australia’s Construction Forecasting Council (CFC) - www.cfc.acif.com.au.

“The ability to predict when and where 32 trades and occupations will be available over the next nine years provides a world class model” said Neil Marshall, Chairman of the Australian Construction Industry Forum, which oversees the CFC. “We are also impressed by the Canadian Construction Sector Council’s consultation process with industry leaders from each sector and region of the country, and with the research on labour market issues, such as the future of mobile workers”.

ACIF oversees and manages the Australian Construction Forecasting Council. Its mission is to create a competitive construction and property industry that is a leader in building a prosperous Australian nation. Membership is open to any Australian building or construction industry association with a national structure and focus.

The Minister for Education, Science and Training, the Hon Julie Bishop MP has welcomed the move, saying, “This new agreement will help the Australian construction industry prepare for future labour needs. A lot of effort went into producing construction forecasts in both Australia and Canada and they will prove a valuable tool for the industry in our two countries. It is important that these construction forecasts are used in conjunction with forecasts on labour requirements that will allow industry and the training sector to respond to these needs in a timely manner.”

OTTAWA – In launching the aqreement with the His Excellency William Fisher, the Australian High Commissioner in Canada, The Honourable Monte Solberg, Minister of Human Resources and Social Development, said “In both countries, the construction sector is an important contributor to the economy and this agreement provides an excellent opportunity to tackle human resources challenges and get skilled tradespeople into both the Canadian and Australian workforce, when and where they are needed.”

Australian High Commissioner Fisher agreed, “This historic industry-led agreement is an example of the key role that innovative approaches can play in international labour market issues. By sharing information, expertise and research, both economies will benefit.”

“The CSC’s Construction Looking Forward reports are certainly a hit here and we are proud that our forecasting work is gaining international recognition,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. The CSC is now in the third year of producing a construction labour requirements forecast, widely used by industry and government decision makers in Canada.

The aim of a recent agreement signed by the CSC and the Australian Construction Industry Forum (ACIF) is to “support and enhance each organization’s ability to forecast construction investment activity, employment demand and supply in the residential and non-residential sectors.”

The CSC is a partnership between business, labour and government with financial support from both industry and government. Established in 2001 to address the workforce needs of the construction industry, the CSC brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical decisions.

Funding for the CSC is being provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.
Synopsis
The Construction Sector Council’s Construction Looking Forward forecast reports, which are valued as a planning tool by decision makers in the Canadian construction industry, have gained international recognition. The CSC has recently signed an agreement with its Australian counterparts to share information on labour forecasting and recruitment practices. The agreement with the Australian Construction Industry Forum will see each country share best practices to refine forecasting abilities and improve solutions to human resource challenges in the construction industry.

For further comment:
Peter Verwer
Chief Executive
Property Council of Australia
0407 463 842
02 9033 1920 

New Employment Program Helps Immigrants Fill Construction Industry Needs

November 15, 2006

PRINCE GEORGE – A new Immigrant Skilled Trades Employment Program (ISTEP) launched today promises to help landed immigrants build careers in British Columbia’s construction industry while helping employers to fill gaps in their workforce. ISTEP also has the potential to be a model for addressing skills shortages across the country.

ISTEP is a joint initiative of the British Columbia Construction Association and the Construction Sector Council (CSC) of Canada with funding support from the Government of Canada’s Foreign Credential Recognition Program.

ISTEP will work with new immigrants who have an interest in the construction trades.

Job coaches located in four regions of the province will directly connect immigrants with employers. They will assess employment potential, coordinate work placements that match skills and experience, and provide ongoing support for both workers and employers. The Job Coaches will be a constant link, helping employers get the job-ready workers they need and advising immigrants on training and career paths.

“The project addresses two major issues for the construction industry,” says George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the CSC.

“It recognizes foreign-worker credentials and provides a long-term solution to the skilled trade shortage facing some employers,” continues Gritziotis, adding that “it also provides a working model for the construction industry across Canada and for other industries as well.”

Manley McLachlan, President of the B.C. Construction Association, sees this as a “win-win situation that will open doors for immigrants and help employers with labour shortages. We have links to hundreds of employers and thousands of jobs across the province,” he says.

“Contractors are recruiting from other countries to try to fill their needs,” he says, “while here in BC, immigrants – a significant provincial resource – face barriers to training and employment.”

Wayne Peppard, Executive Director of the BC Building Trades is pleased that the project ensures that immigrants will be paid according to their skills and at industry standards. “We’ve worked hard to set a decent wage and living standard for construction workers in this province,” he says. “This is about connecting immigrant workers with well paying jobs in an industry that is booming.”

Peppard added, “new immigrant workers often bring with them valuable skills that are lost to the workforce. ISTEP will put those skills to work and help immigrants build rewarding careers while helping to alleviate skills shortages.”
For further information:
Paul Mitchell, Project Manager
ISTEP
(250) 475-1077
Rosemary Sparks,
Director of Operations
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552

New nine-year forecast helps construction industry, government address labour needs

June 27, 2006

REGINA, SK. – A made-in Saskatchewan boom in engineering and industrial projects will spark a high demand for many skilled trades over the next few years, according to a new provincial forecast of labour requirements in the construction industry from 2006 to 2014.

The report by the Construction Sector Council (CSC) and its partners says employers can expect recruiting challenges until 2009 for carpenters, heavy equipment operators, plumbers, roofers and shinglers, steamfitters, pipefitters, sprinkler system installers, and welders.

“Like other provinces, Saskatchewan is experiencing skilled labour shortages, so it is useful to be able to predict labour needs down to the trade,” says Michael Fougere, President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association. “We expect to see labour shortages into the future and this report will help industry and government address our labour market needs.”

Doug Muir, Director of Apprenticeship at the Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission, says retirements will present a significant challenge over the forecast period as well, particularly with respect to training. “Knowing the when and where of labour requirements allows us to adjust the training plan accordingly,” he says.

The forecast says that from 2006 to 2014, the province will have to replace more than 3,600 retiring workers, in addition to those who will be needed for new projects.

Ken McKinlay, Executive Director of the Saskatchewan Home Builders’ Association says that any anticipated slowdown in residential will be mild, the housing and renovation sectors will need to maintain its current labour force to at least 2010. A slowing in the residential sector would see workers still engaged in light commercial activities.

The CSC produced the forecast with input from all sectors of the construction industry and government. This is the second yearly edition of Construction Looking Forward. Reports are currently being released for each province, and the new reality of the threat to economic growth, posed by fewer workers and more work, is a common theme throughout.

“In this new reality of more work and fewer workers, proper training, health and safety on the job and recruiting youth to the trades are all priorities,” says Terry Parker, Business Manager, Saskatchewan Provincial Building & Construction Trades Council.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001 as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. Funding for this project was provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program. The report is available on the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

MORE INFORMATION:
Michael Fougere
President
Saskatchewan Construction Association
(306) 525-0171
michaelf@scaonline.ca

Ken McKinlay
Executive Director
Saskatchewan Home Builders’ Association
(306) 569-2424
kmckinlay@shba.ca

Rosemary Sparks
Director of Projects
Construction Sector Council,
(905) 852-9186
sparks@csc.ca.org

Manitoba’s construction industry to focus on training and recruitment, as “exceptional expansion” forecast

June 26, 2006

WINNIPEG – The boom in all sectors of Manitoba’s construction industry is expected to last for several more years, according to a new forecast released today by the Construction Sector Council (CSC) and its partners.

According to Construction Looking Forward – Labour Requirements from 2006 to 2014 for Manitoba, the construction industry will continue to create jobs and boost the province’s economy right up until 2014, though looming retirements will present a challenge when it comes to replacing some skilled trades.

“By providing details about what trades will be needed where and when, the forecast is just the tool we need to meet that challenge,” says David Martin, Executive Director, Manitoba Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council,

The report notes that more than 18% of the province’s construction workforce, or 4,000 workers, will be needed to replace retirees. Another 2,500 workers will be needed to meet new demand over the forecast period.

“Recruitment and training will be a key priority, especially for certain trades in industrial and engineering building that are in high demand across the country in the short term,” adds Mr. Martin.

The CSC has been working with all sectors of the construction industry over the past year to develop Construction Looking Forward reports for each province. They are being released across the country this month.

Manitoba differs from other provinces in that building continues in all sectors throughout the forecast period, whereas most provinces see a downturn in some sectors after 2009.

“The Manitoba economy is in good shape and a major source of growth is construction investment,” adds Peter Wightman, Executive Director, Construction Labour Relations Association of Manitoba. “By working together and with the help of this forecast we can keep it that way.” Quoting from the report, he points out that “from 2006 to 2009, there is exceptional expansion, with no equivalent in other provinces.”

“We are pleased to learn that the industry is committed to recruiting drives that target youth and new workforce entrants. I applaud the Construction Sector Council and its partners in working together to provide a comprehensive report that not only offers foresight but is focused on recruitment and training in Manitoba,” said Barry Rempel, President and CEO of Winnipeg Airports Authority Inc.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001, as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis.

Construction Looking Forward reports are produced annually by the CSC for all provinces. They are available electronically at www.csc-ca.org.

Funding for this project was provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:
David Martin
Executive Director
Manitoba Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council
(204) 956-7425
david@mbctc.mb.ca

Peter Wightman
Executive Director
Construction Labour Relations Association of Manitoba
(204) 775-0441
clram@mb.sympatico.ca

Rosemary Sparks
Director of Operations
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186
sparks@csc-ca.org

New forecast says Ontario construction industry poised to meet regional demands

June 20, 2006

TORONTO – Ontario is in good shape to meet the demands of a growing construction industry, despite its shrinking workforce, according to a new forecast released today by the Construction Sector Council (CSC). Construction Looking Forward – Labour Requirements from 2006 to 2014 for Ontario, says a mobile workforce that shifts to different regions of the province will be key to meeting industry demand over the next nine years.

The forecast says that investment will increase by an average of 2% per year, and that an estimated 48,000 workers will be needed to replace retirees. More than 22,000 additional workers will be required to meet new construction demand.

The CSC has been working with all disciplines of the industry over the past year to develop Construction Looking Forward reports for each province. They are being released across the country this month.

“The regional perspective in the Ontario report gives industry leaders the foresight needed to keep the construction industry on a viable track,” says Ron Martin, Executive Director of Sudbury Construction Association. The forecast looks at factors that affect labour requirements -- such as investment and retirement rates -- for Ontario, and separately for each of its five regions.

“The pace of activity is manageable because as the workforce shifts from region to region, labour markets balance,” adds Martin. “But we are keeping an eye on demands from the West as that could disturb that balance.”

Patrick Dillon of the Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council says “the data on what skills will be needed and where is particularly useful for the development of training programs, which will be very much in demand. We have the training capacity to meet future needs.”

On the residential side, Victor Fiume, President of the Ontario Home Builders Association, says recruitment and training will also remain a priority for the housing sector as housing starts are expected to remain healthy in Ontario.

“When labour is tight, safety and quality concerns are top of mind,” adds Ron McGillis, Manager - Safety, Compliance & Contractor Quality at Ontario Power Generation says. “The type of detailed information in this forecast, such as when and where shortages can occur, gives us the ‘heads up’ we need.”

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001, as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. Construction Looking Forward reports are produced annually by the CSC for all provinces. They are available electronically at www.csc-ca.org.

Funding for this project was provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:
Patrick Dillon
Business Manager and Secretary Treasurer
Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council
Tel (416) 679-8887
Cell (416) 828-6617
patrick@ontariobuildingtrades.com

Ron Martin
Executive Director
Sudbury Construction Association
(705) 673-5619
martin@constructionnorth.com

Rosemary Sparks
Director of Projects
Construction Sector Council
Tel (905) 852-9186
Cell (416) 271-2633
sparks@csc-ca.org

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