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Construction Reaches All Time High in B.C. 47,000 Skilled Trades Workers Needed to Keep Pace

June 9, 2008

Victoria – British Columbia leads the country in construction employment growth as the number of construction projects hits a record high according to this year’s forecast from the Construction Sector Council.

Major projects relating to the Olympics, Asia Pacific Gateway, mining manufacturing and utilities are turning up the pressure on British Columbia’s most precious resource – its skilled labour force, which has grown by 70% to 139,000 workers since 2001.

“While there’s stiff competition for skilled workers right across Canada, this is where we really need them,” said Clyde Scollan, President of the BC Construction Labour Relations Association. “The crunch is on with major new projects across so many sectors in B.C.”

The information is contained in the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) fourth annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed forecast of labour market trends from 2008 to 2016 for British Columbia.

The report finds that 26,500 new workers will be required from now until 2016 to replace retiring baby boomers. Another 21,000 workers will be needed to keep pace with new projects in B.C.

“Convincing those on the verge of retirement to stay on longer will help,” said Manley McLachlan, President of the BC Construction Association. “We also need to increase the number of immigrants, temporary foreign workers and more aggressively recruit youth, women and Aboriginals to keep projects on schedule.”

Rising commodity prices have increased investment in the mining industry, tourism, transportation, warehousing and the construction of facilities for the 2010 Winter Olympics. New ethanol, pipeline, and hydroelectric projects have also been announced.

The annual forecast shows housing activity will remain strong overall,” said MJ Whitemarsh, CEO of the Canadian Home Builders' Association of BC. “There’s a real need to keep training and upgrading the skills of the current workforce while attracting new people.”

In 2010 non-residential construction labour markets will ease for the first time in 8 years as several major engineering and industrial projects near completion. However, overall construction activity will remain at healthy levels of investment.

“That means continuing job opportunities to keep our skilled trades workers in demand,” said Wayne Peppard, Executive Director of the BC Building Trades.

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For Further Information Contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186
(416) 271-2633

Help Wanted: 250,000 Skilled Trades Workers Canada’s Construction Sector Pushed to the Limit

June 2, 2008

Mississauga – Rising commodity prices, and major new infrastructure projects are stretching the Canadian construction industry to the limits of the national workforce, said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council.

“I’d call it a perfect storm,” said Robert Blakely, Labour Co-Chair of the Construction Sector Council. “Major infrastructure projects right across Canada including strong government-led building of hospitals and schools as well as industrial and engineering projects are boosting the economy, but creating a real challenge for our labour force.”

The information is contained in the Construction Sector Council’s annual forecast of labour market trends called “Construction Looking Forward.” This is the most advanced and detailed forecast of labour market conditions available in Canada.

The report finds that that an unprecedented 42,000 new workers were hired last year to meet increased construction activity. Another 94,000 will be needed over the next 8 years to keep pace with new projects, and an additional 162,000 workers are required to replace retiring baby boomers.

“There’s an urgent need for new workers at every level, from residential to industrial and engineering,” said Tim Flood, Business Co-Chair of the Construction Sector Council. “We’ve got to step up our campaign to convince young people to sign up for apprenticeship programs and consider a skilled trade as a career.”

Despite economic uncertainty in the U.S, construction has been a leading industry in terms of growth and employment in Canada over the past decade. National employment across the entire construction industry has risen by a record 39% over the past five years.

The national forecast shows British Columbia and Alberta are the pacesetters with new projects increasing employment to record levels. Dramatic increases in employment have yet to come in Newfoundland and Labrador, Manitoba and Saskatchewan where a number of big resource-based projects are in the planning stages. New Brunswick also faces one of the most demanding recruiting tasks with big resource projects scheduled in the coming years. Steady annual growth is forecast in the industrial and engineering trades in Ontario and Quebec.

Industry efforts at recruiting, training and retaining trades workers matched strong demands and sustained the expansion until recently. Trades and occupations in demand include industrial and engineering trades, construction managers, contractors and supervisors.

“I’m hoping we can help convince some of those on the verge of retirement to stay on longer to help ease the pressure,” said George Gritziotis. “Increasing the number of temporary foreign workers, recruiting more women and Aboriginals is also a must to keep projects on schedule.”

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, government, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For Further Information Contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

The Government of Canada Takes Action to Address Canada’s Need for Skilled Labour

May 7, 2008

OTTAWA – The Honourable Monte Solberg, Minister of Human Resources and Social Development, today announced new support for the Construction Sector Council to address skilled labour shortages in the construction industry.

Speaking on the federal government's plan to meet Canada's labour market challenges at the Canadian Building and Construction Trades' Legislative Conference, Minister Solberg announced new investments totalling more than $5.5 million over the next three years. This funding will help the construction industry by providing increased labour market information, addressing recruitment and retention issues and broadening the Construction Sector Council's outreach initiatives.

"Government can't address labour market problems by itself, but private sector and government partnerships are working," said Minister Solberg. "Today's investment in the Construction Sector Council is an example of the strategic partnerships our government develops to ensure that Canada has the best-educated, most-skilled and most flexible work force in the world. We are supporting one of Canada's largest industries so that construction jobs can be filled with employees who have the right skills."

The Government of Canada is providing $4.5 million to the Construction Sector Council's Labour Market Information Program. This will allow the construction industry to respond effectively and efficiently to the industry's demand for decision-making tools to help address human resources issues in a timely manner. It will also enable decision makers to evaluate the magnitude of construction labour shortages in specific regions, so that action can be taken.

A second contribution of $258,000 will allow the Construction Sector Council to explore the potential of retaining older workers to improve the sustainability of the construction labour force. As well, the Council will use this funding to get the most from all available labour pools and target specific audiences such as Aboriginal people, women, older workers, immigrants and temporary foreign workers. Finally, new funding of $829,000 will allow the Council to continue to expand its role as the national focal point for work force development in the construction industry, and to increase its outreach to partners at all levels-local, regional, national and even international.

"The Construction Sector Council appreciates the Government of Canada's continued commitment to the construction industry's work force development," said Mr. George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. "Thanks to this contribution, the Council will be able to take on a new project to better serve the construction industry, while exploring new solutions to upcoming skills shortages, and broadening our outreach activities to build and maintain partnerships in Canada, and across the world."

Sector councils play a vital role in helping to strengthen the labour market, thereby contributing to the productivity and competitiveness of the economy and the standard of living of all Canadians. They bring together government, business, labour and educational stakeholders in key sectors to share ideas, concerns and perspectives about work force issues. Canada's sector councils have been successful at meeting emerging skills requirements, addressing skills and labour shortages, and building essential skills in the workplace as a foundation for continuous learning.

This news release is available in alternative formats upon request.

Visit the new Human Resources and Social Development Canada Web site at www.hrsdc.gc.ca.

For more information, please contact

Human Resources and Social Development Canada
Media Relations Office
819-994-5559

or

Office of Minister Solberg
Pema Lhalungpa
Press Secretary
819-994-2482

Number of temporary foreign workers in construction is on the rise

April 17, 2008

OTTAWA – A new study says the number of temporary foreign workers being used to meet short-term peak demand in the construction industry is on the rise, especially in Alberta, British Columbia, and Ontario. If labour market opinion approvals over the past few years continue at the current rate, Alberta could potentially see a 600% increase in temporary foreign workers.

Although the stated number of construction temporary foreign workers is minimal, the trend as indicated by a six-fold increase is significant. Last year the Construction Sector Council’s Labour Market Information Program identified the need to train close to 250,000 workers by 2015 in order to replace a retiring workforce and to meet new demand for construction projects. Temporary foreign workers have been needed to fill vacant positions in specific regions and for specific trades requiring skilled and qualified workers immediately.

In response to the industry’s need to know more about this crucial labour source, the Construction Sector Council has just published: “Temporary Foreign Workers in the Canadian Construction Industry: An Analysis of Programs and Mechanisms.”

“Labour and business leaders wanted to get a handle on how many temporary foreign workers there are in the industry, where they are coming from and where they are going to work,” says CSC Executive Director George Gritziotis, noting that “the study also provided an opportunity to examine the entire process that involves a number of stakeholders.”

What came through clearly in this study is that temporary foreign workers are fulfilling a critical short term need at the worksite, and that their employment is on the rise across Canada.

Other highlights:

Most foreign workers come from the United States, with the United Kingdom and the Philippines tied for second place. Most are employed in the Institutional, Commercial and Industrial sector, with the New Home Building and Renovation sector close behind.

Study participants were nearly universal in their praise for the quality of temporary foreign workers who have made it through the system and the ways in which they are contributing to the worksite. Respondents also identified ways the processes and mechanisms could be improved.

In addition to an extensive document and literature review, 69 in-depth interviews were conducted with construction industry employers, associations, training bodies, unions, recruitment and immigrant servicing agencies.

The Construction Sector Council is a not-for-profit national labour/management organization mandated to address the human resource issues facing the construction industry in Canada. Funding for this study was provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program. It can be viewed at www.csc-ca.org.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Rosemary Sparks
Senior Director of Planning and Development
Construction Sector Council
613-569-5552
www.csc-ca.org

Community Colleges Join forces with Construction to Address Skill Shortages

March 31, 2008

OTTAWA – Last year the Construction Sector Council’s Labour Market Information Program identified a need to replace 152,000 skilled workers who will be retiring over the next 10 years.

“This represents a significant training need,” says George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council (CSC). “Trades training is key to the future of the industry, to the future of our economy really,” he adds.

That’s one of the reasons that the CSC has signed a partnership agreement with the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC). The two organizations will collaborate to make the right training available to develop the next generation of skilled tradespeople.

“It’s a perfect fit,” says ACCC President James Knight. “The CSC has the data that shows what training is needed, when and where. The ACCC can make that training a reality. And together we will work on marketing.”

As Mr. Knight explains “ACCC strives to increase the responsiveness of colleges and institutes to sectoral labour needs. This agreement with the Construction Sector Council is a step in the right direction. Construction has been a highly successful Canadian industry, but it is now hampered by a critical shortage of skilled labour. Colleges and institutes must find the means to meet these needs.”

The CSC is also interested in exploring e-learning opportunities with the ACCC and its member colleges. The CSC houses an e-learning centre with four existing courses and plans to develop nine more. “We hope to provide courses that support existing college offerings and meet new and emerging industry needs, such as supervision, for example,” Mr. Gritziotis says.

The CSC is a partnership between labour, business and government with a mandate to address the human resource needs of the construction industry. The ACCC is the national and international voice of Canada’s colleges and institutes. It helps member institutions to meet Canada’s education and training needs.

Funding for this project was provided by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Rosemary Sparks
Senior Director of Planning and Development
Construction Sector Council
613-569-5552
www.csc-ca.org

Lorna Malcolmson
Manager, Communications and Information Services
Association of Canadian Community Colleges
613-746-2222 ext. 3123
www.accc.ca

Government of Canada gives boost to national construction industry

February 20, 2008

VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA – The Honourable Gary Lunn, Minister of Natural Resources, on behalf of the Honourable Monte Solberg, Minister of Human Resources and Social Development, today announced funding for the Construction Sector Council to address the industry's long-term human resources issues now and in the future.

Speaking at the Selkirk Waterfront Condominium construction project in Victoria, Minister Lunn announced $3 million over four years to support the work of the Council in dealing with skilled labour shortages.

"In the past two years, our government has fulfilled its commitment to introduce major initiatives that directly help skilled trades workers and the skilled trades sector, including the Apprenticeship Incentive Grant, the Tradesperson's Tools Deduction, and the Apprenticeship Job Creation Tax Credit," said Minister Lunn. "Today's investment in the Construction Sector Council goes even further. We are supporting the construction industry-one of Canada's largest employers-so that construction jobs can be filled quickly over the long term with employees who have the right skills."

The Construction Sector Council will receive the funding through the federal government's Sector Council Program. The funding will enable the Council to focus over the next four years on implementing its plan for programs and projects that respond to skills needs, strengthen human resources development, and create new opportunities in the Canadian construction industry.

"The Construction Sector Council appreciates the federal government's continued commitment to the construction industry's work force development," said Mr. George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. "Today's announced investment allows us to continue working on a national staging ground to build relationships with all stakeholders, address regional realities of our labour market, leverage best practices, and come up with new and innovative solutions."

Sector councils play a vital role in helping to strengthen the labour market, thereby contributing to the productivity and competitiveness of the economy and the standard of living of all Canadians. They bring together governments, business, labour and educational stakeholders in key sectors to share ideas, concerns and perspectives about work force issues. Canada's sector councils have been successful at meeting emerging skills requirements, addressing skills and labour shortages, and building essential skills in the workplace as a foundation for continuous learning.

Additionally, through its unprecedented $33-billion Building Canada infrastructure plan, the Government of Canada will provide long-term, stable and predictable funding to help meet infrastructure needs across Canada. Building Canada will support a stronger, safer and better country.

This news release is available in alternative formats upon request.

Visit the new Human Resources and Social Development Canada Web site at www.hrsdc.gc.ca

FOR MORE INFORMATION (MEDIA ONLY):
Media Relations Office
Human Resources and Social Development Canada
819-994-5559

New certification program means safer buildings

November 14, 2007

OTTAWA – Buildings in Canada will become safer than ever for Canadians and their families as a new professional certification program for Building Officials gets underway.

For the first time, Building Officials–the people who review all plans and inspect homes, apartments, hospitals, office towers, shopping malls, and many other types of buildings to make sure they comply with current building codes–will be certified to a National Standard as qualified professionals.

"The result is safe, code-compliant buildings right across the country," says Mannie Withrow, who will award the first 14 certifications at a special event today at the Sheraton Hotel in Ottawa. Mr. Withrow is President of the Alliance of Canadian Building Officials’ Associations (ACBOA)".

"It is high time these professionals who are knowledgeable and well-trained get the credit and recognition they deserve," adds Mr. Withrow, noting that Building Officials, who work behind the scenes to provide a level of comfort and safety for all Canadians, often did not get the respect they deserve because of the lack of national standards for this profession. "When we do our job right, nothing happens and Canadians get to enjoy the use and occupancy of all buildings across this great country."

Over the past couple of years, the Construction Sector Council (CSC) has partnered with ACBOA, the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC), and other industry stakeholders to develop national occupational standards and a certification process that measures Building Officials' qualifications against an approved standard.

The CSC's Executive Director, George Gritziotis, says "Another important result is that the new national program means Building Officials' credentials will be recognized in all jurisdictions allowing them to work in any province." "The initiative addresses the challenge of an aging workforce and the inadequate supply of skilled labour," he says. "It will provide greater worker mobility, a wider variety of job opportunities and maintain the high level of professionalism required of this important occupation in the construction industry."

Established in 2001, the Construction Sector Council (CSC) is a not–for–profit national labour management organization mandated to address the human resource issues facing the construction industry in Canada. The CSC is supported by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:
Mannie Withrow, President
Alliance of Canadian Building Officials' Associations
(902) 897-3170
mwithrow@colchester.ca

Rosemary Sparks, Senior Director of Planning and Development
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552
sparks@csc-ca.org

BACKGROUNDER

A National Certification Program for Building Officials

What do Building Officials do?

There are about 7,000 Building Officials in Canada.

Building Officials review plans and inspect the construction of homes, apartments, hospitals, office towers, and many other types of buildings to make sure they comply with building codes. Their goal is to ensure that structural safety, accessibility, fire safety, health, and a range of other issues are addressed prior to occupancy.

Why is a certification program necessary?

When it comes to certification and licensing requirements for professional Building Officials, each province and territory has had different standards and expectations. Up until recently, there was no consistent national standard for performance, and an uneven quality of service that would sometimes lead to a lack of credibility in the inspection industry.

What are the benefits of a certification program?

A National Certification Program will lead to safer buildings, more recognition and a better public image for professional Building Officials. As well, their skills will be recognized anywhere in Canada allowing them to work in different provinces or jurisdictions. The program will also reduce exposure to legal action endured by municipal governments and others when projects are delayed or not up to code.

How did it come about?

The federal government became involved in the late 1990s by bringing together all interested stakeholders to align the certification, licensing and performance standards for Building Officials and for Home and Property Inspectors across Canada. Soon, national occupational standards were developed, outlining the required skills, knowledge and abilities that Building Officials needed to perform their duties.

Based on those performance standards, the Construction Sector Council, the Alliance of Canadian Building Officials Association and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation set up a process for Building Officials to become certified by accredited educational institutions as qualified professionals.

What is the process?

The certification program judges the Building Official's performance against an approved standard that ensures consistent, safe and high-quality inspection services.

In general, Building Officials must prove that they are familiar with current and past provincial and national building codes and standards, federal and provincial legislation and municipal bylaws pertaining to health, fire and life safety as they relate to construction. They must have a solid understanding of all aspects of the construction industry, including construction methods, procedures, practices and materials. These and other qualifications are learned and tested through a vigorous program of study, and on-the-job training requirements.

There are three stages to the National Certification Program for Building Officials: Candidate, Associate and Certified. Specific skill sets, education and training are necessary at each stage.

On November 14, 2007, the Minister of Human Resources and Social Development will attend the launch of a new national certification and accreditation system in Ottawa where the first 14 Building Officials from across Canada will receive their certification. Representatives from the many parties involved in creating this new certification system including, the Construction Sector Council, the Alliance of Canadian Building Officials, and the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, will be present.

The Construction Sector Council introduces www.constructionforecasts.ca!

August 23, 2007

Construction Forecast Data is now available online and at your fingertips. Customize reports by easily obtaining data from any combination of trades, provinces and other variables.

With a click, this unique industry planning tool delivers sound forecasting and planning data covering up to 10 years, in 31 major construction trades.

In mere seconds, a user can determine the availability of a construction trade/occupation in labour markets across Canada. They can also generate customized tables and graphs on a broad range of selected categories within sector, trade or province. With another click the data is converted to any of a variety of chart formats.

www.constructionforecasts.ca is…

convenient, eliminating hours of sifting through reports and trade publications and enabling rapid response to medium and long term needs.
comprehensive, assisting the preplanning process with consistent labour market and economic information for all users, industry wide.
simple to use, providing a glossary, FAQ and easy to follow guides and suggestions.
The Forecast Quick Picks feature instantly presents the most frequently accessed data in the most common categories such as construction investment, employment and the economy.

Manitoba Poised for a Record Expansion in Construction Sector

June 21, 2007

WINNIPEG – Manitoba is on the brink of a 10-year increase in construction activity says a new report released today by the Construction Sector Council (CSC).

According to the CSC’s third annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015 for Manitoba,’’ construction activity will continue to climb at a steady pace until 2015, enabling the sector to plan effectively for the increased need for labour.

“These forecasts are an important tool for our industry to effectively plan for their workforce requirements for the next several years,” said John Bockstael, Vice-President of Bockstael Construction and President, Winnipeg Construction Association. “With input from stakeholders from across the province, this report has the most up to date, practical information for this sector.”

Manitoba’s steady rise in construction activity is unique to the rest of Canada, says the CSC report. Projections for most provinces show periods of cyclical declines over several years but in Manitoba construction will experience continued moderate growth across the entire forecast period - a unique expansion across Canadian provinces.

The report notes that 18 percent or 4,000 of the province’s construction work force will be needed to replace retirees. Another 4,200 workers will be needed to meet new construction demand over the forecast period.

David Martin, Executive Director, Manitoba Building and Construction Trades Council and a member of CSC’s Board of Directors notes that "we will use all options available to us to meet the expanding workforce needs, including mobility of workers and linking unemployed workers in other provinces to opportunities in Manitoba, to ensure that contractors have the skilled labour they require."’

“This forecast helps industry, especially multi-year projects like the floodway, prepare for future labour challenges within the construction industry,’’ adds Ernie Gilroy, Chief Executive Officer of the Manitoba Floodway Authority. “Data in the report enables industry to plan and identify strategies to attract and retain workers for the benefit of workers, employers and the economy."

The report also states that the next several years will be steady in terms of growth, but activity will shift among the various sectors. From now through to 2009, the engineering sector will be tight, at which point construction activity will spread to the commercial, industrial and residential sectors.

“The increasing need for more construction workers in Manitoba and across Canada compels industry and governments to target their efforts to ensure all potential workers, including Aboriginal peoples, women, youth, unemployed and underemployed workers and immigrant workers are part of a thoughtful and comprehensive solution,’’ says CSC Executive Director George Gritziotis.

A new feature to this year’s report allows stakeholders to perform customized data searches online. This tool will help individuals source the exact data that is relevant to their needs.

Construction Looking Forward forecasts for each province are being released in June. The National Summary will be unveiled at the end of this month.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001 as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. Funding for this project was provided by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. The report is available on the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

MORE INFORMATION:
Dave Martin, Executive Director
Manitoba Building & Construction Trades Council
(204) 956-7425
david@mbctc.mb.ca

John Bockstael, Vice-President
Bockstael Construction and
President, Winnipeg Construction Association
(204) 233-7135
jbockstael@bockstael.com

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552
sparks@csc-ca.org

New forecast says Ontario has the tools to meet rising demand for construction workers

June 19, 2007

THUNDER BAY – Ontario is well equipped to handle the need for more than 85,000 new construction workers during the next nine years as detailed in the new forecast released today by the Construction Sector Council (CSC).

Construction Looking Forward: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015 for Ontario, says the province’s construction industry will need 50,000 workers to replace retirees and another 35,000 to keep pace with steady growth during the forecast period.

The report predicts average annual growth of 3% in the residential sector and 2% in the non-residential sector in the period leading up to 2015.

According to the forecast, attracting, recruiting and training the needed workforce at this pace will be a manageable challenge for employers, labour groups and training institutions. The report examines Ontario’s construction industry in five regions, Greater Toronto, Central, Northern, Eastern and the Southwest.

Construction Looking Forward: Labour Requirements from 2007 to 2015 for Ontario, says regional mobility within the province will help balance the need for workers but warns that Ontario’s labour markets could be disturbed in the short term as workers seek job opportunities in tighter labour markets, such as the Western provinces.

The CSC produced the forecast with input from all sectors of the construction industry and government through the region’s Labour Market Information (LMI) Committee.

Construction Looking Forward forecasts will be released for each province over the coming weeks.

Ron McGillis, Manager - Safety, Compliance & Contractor Quality, Ontario Power Generation and Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Ontario Construction User Council says, “The Ontario report, which looks at factors that affect labour requirements – such as investment and retirement rates – gives industry leaders the insight needed to achieve continued prosperity in the Ontario construction industry.”

"The LMI report helps us project opportunities for attracting Canadian youth, unemployed and displaced workers from other sectors into the construction industry so we can meet the needs of Ontario's economy," said Patrick Dillon, Business Manager and Secretary Treasurer, Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario and a member of CSC’s Board of Directors.

“With housing starts expected to remain above long term averages and home renovations in Ontario expected to rise steadily during the forecast period, the housing industry must make recruitment and training a priority,” says Brian Johnston, President, Ontario Home Builders’ Association. “The labour market information in this CSC forecast is critical for our planning as we develop programs that are specific to our sector.”

“The increasing need for more construction workers in Ontario and across Canada compels industry and governments to target their efforts to ensure all potential workers, including Aboriginal peoples, women, youth, unemployed and underemployed workers and immigrant workers are part of a thoughtful and comprehensive solution,’’ says CSC Executive Director George Gritziotis.

A new feature to this year’s Construction Looking Forward report allows stakeholders to perform customized data searches online. This tool will help individuals source out the exact data that is relevant to their needs.

The Construction Sector Council was established in 2001 as an independent labour/business partnership to address the workforce needs of the construction industry. The CSC is a neutral forum that brings together stakeholders to provide data that industry can use to make critical planning decisions. CSC provides this data to industry who undertake their own analysis. The Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program provided funding for this project.

The report is available on the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

MORE INFORMATION:
Patrick Dillon, Business Manager and Secretary Treasurer
Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario
Tel (416) 679-8887
Cell (416) 347-8245
patrick@ontariobuildingtrades.com

Ron Martin, Executive Director
Sudbury Construction Association
(705) 673-5619
martin@constructionnorth.com

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552
sparks@csc-ca.org

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