Home » News and Media » Press Releases

Press Releases

Alberta’s Construction Sector Must Plan Now

June 22, 2009

30,000 skilled trades’ workers will be needed in the economic upturn

Edmonton – Representatives from labour and industry are taking part in Alberta’s Construction Labour Market Symposium today to ensure that Alberta has the skilled labour force in place when the economy turns around.

“It’s crucial that we plan now for the economic upturn,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “When big energy projects gear back up we have to make sure our skilled workforce is ready.”

Highlight’s of the Construction Sector Council’s annual report “Construction Looking Forward” for Alberta show construction employment in the province is on the decline after more than a decade of extraordinary growth.

Although a number of major manufacturing projects are planned or underway, including three ethanol production plants, employment losses will continue into 2011. These losses will shift from residential trades to the skilled non-residential workforce after the cancellation or postponement of several proposed oil industry projects.

When Alberta starts to come out of the recession in 2010, big energy projects are expected to come back on stream in 2013.

“Transportation and related projects will also pick up in the medium term,” said Ken Gibson, Executive Director of the Alberta Construction Association. “It means we have some breathing room now to plan for better times.”

Government investment is expected to increase rapidly in 2009 and 2010 as the fiscal stimulus package is spent on various public infrastructure projects from water, sewer and roads to hospitals and schools.

“Our challenge is to make sure that experienced trades’ people who left the industry and province in the downturn come back,” said Jay Westman, President and CEO of Jayman MasterBUILT. “We know that when the recession ends we’ll need these skilled trades’ workers.”

The forecast shows that employment in residential and non-residential trades will rise by 2015, exceeding 2008 employment levels. New housing investment and housing starts will rebound in the longer term reaching 32 thousand units in 2017.

The forecast also projects that as many as 22,000 construction workers are expected to retire from 2009 to 2017. Another 8,000 new workers will be needed to meet construction demand later in the forecast period as the economy strengthens and major oil sand investment increases starting in 2014.

“We’re confident that today’s symposium will help us put a regional plan in place to meet the need for skilled trades’ people regardless of economic cycles,” said Ron Harry, Executive Director of the Building Trades of Alberta. “Industry and government must meet the challenges of volatile markets by continually utilizing skilled trades people from all parts of Canada, replacing retirees and improving the skills of our construction workforce.”

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national organization committed to supporting the future needs of Canada’s construction industry through a highly skilled workforce.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide governments, colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to ensure Canada’s construction industry remains a leading sector in Canada’s economy.

Alberta’s Construction Looking Forward Scenario 2009-2010 will be available in the coming weeks along with a summary from the Alberta Labour Market Symposium and all forecast scenario data at www.constructionforecasts.ca

For Further Information Contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(416) 271-2633

Scott Brownrigg
Sussex Strategy Group
(416) 277-8847

Canada Will Still Need Record Number of Skilled Workers

June 17, 2009

Ottawa – The construction industry is poised to play a major role in leading Canada out of the recession, the Construction Sector Council (CSC) announced today.

“We know there are construction projects right across Canada that are ready to go,” said George Gritiziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “The construction industry could play a major role in building a stronger economy, depending on the timing and implementation of government funded projects.”

Federal and provincial government fiscal stimulus investments are expected to boost construction spending and employment over the next three years, offsetting the effects of a decline in housing starts and the temporary delays in major resource and industrial projects.

The information is contained in highlights of the Construction Sector Council’s annual national forecast of labour market trends called “Construction Looking Forward.” It is the most detailed and advanced forecast of labour market conditions available in Canada.

The forecast shows that 317,000 skilled workers will be needed between now and 2017. That’s a record high. To meet the expected rise in construction activity in the longer term, 149,000 workers will be required. Another 168,000 construction workers will be needed to replace retiring baby boomers over the forecast period.

“The demand for skilled labour over the next decade will reach an all time high,” said Robert Blakely, Director of Canadian Affairs, Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO. “Government and industry have to step up their recruiting efforts, career promotion and training to build the skilled workforce Canada will need.”

The pace of construction activity will accelerate between 2013 and 2017. “If there was ever a time to plan and prepare the construction industry for the economic upturn, this is it,” said Tim Flood, Business Co-Chair of the Construction Sector Council.

As a result of government backed institutional, transportation and energy projects, Quebec has sustained employment growth through the recession. Proposed major projects in mining, manufacturing and utility industries coupled with government infrastructure and industrial projects are sustaining employment growth in British Columbia. In Ontario, construction labour markets will experience a soft landing compared to other industries, while in Alberta employment slows after more than a decade of extraordinary growth.

Momentum is also being created by new and ongoing projects in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Newfoundland and Labrador. When combined with government stimulus initiatives, these projects which have helped to sustain construction employment.

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business. It has become a respected voice for commentary and perspective on labour market trends.

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national organization committed to supporting the future needs of Canada’s construction industry through a highly skilled workforce.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide governments, colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to ensure Canada’s construction industry remains a leading sector in Canada’s economy.

The national “Construction Looking Forward” Scenario 2009-2017 will be available in the coming weeks along with all forecast scenario data at www.constructionforecasts.ca

For Further Information Contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(416) 271-2633

Scott Brownrigg
Sussex Strategy Group
(416) 277-8847

Construction Trades’ Workers in High Demand in Saskatchewan

June 11, 2009

Double Digit Employment Growth in Many Skilled Trades

Regina – Construction trades are in high demand in Saskatchewan where industrial, civil engineering and institutional projects are accelerating the province’s skilled trades’ force toward record employment levels, the Construction Sector Council (CSC) announced today at the Saskatchewan Construction Labour Market Symposium.

“Record investment in this province is leading to record employment in the construction industry,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “This is one of the few sectors where we can say, what recession.”

Highlights of the Construction Sector Council’s annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward” for Saskatchewan shows employment in 33 trades and occupations tracked by the CSC will increase by more than 7% each year in 2009 and 2010. Currently more than 25,700 people are employed in the construction trades in Saskatchewan.

“We’re seeing unprecedented growth and opportunity in Saskatchewan’s construction sector this year compared to other provinces and industries,” said Michael Fougere, President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association. “Just how much growth and opportunity depends on when government infrastructure and private projects get rolling.”

Regional representatives are attending today’s symposium to discuss labour market trends and how Saskatchewan can best meet demands for a skilled construction labour force.

“Right now we’re in a great position,” said Terry Parker, Business Manager of the Saskatchewan Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council.

“A combination of good timing and aggressive recruiting is helping us fill jobs with workers leaving projects that are wrapping up in other provinces.”

The demand for construction trades is being driven by both residential and non residential investment including mining and manufacturing projects either planned or underway. As a result, more than 4,300 new skilled trades’ workers will be needed to meet peak demand in 2014. Another 4,400 are required to replace retiring baby boomers over the next decade.

“With the right planning, and strong focus on training and recruiting, Saskatchewan should have a new generation of trades people, supervisors, and managers ready when needed,” said Sid Matthews, President of the Construction Labour Relations Association of Saskatchewan. “That’s our goal.”

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national organization committed to supporting the future needs of Canada’s construction industry through a highly skilled workforce.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide governments, colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to ensure Canada’s construction industry remains a leading sector in Canada’s economy.

Saskatchewan’s Construction Looking Forward Scenario 2009-2010 will be available in the coming weeks along with a summary from the Saskatchewan Labour Market Symposium and all forecast scenario data at www.constructionforecasts.ca

For Further Information Contact:

Scott Brownrigg
Sussex Strategy Group
Cell (416) 277-8847

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
Cell (416) 271-2633

Atlantic Canada Needs 20,000 Skilled Trades’ Workers

June 4, 2009

Worker Mobility Key to Sustaining Strength

Saint John – Planned major industrial, resource and government infrastructure projects will help Atlantic Canada’s construction industry gain momentum through the recession, the Construction Sector Council announced today at the Atlantic Construction Labour Market Symposium.

“A regional approach is needed to make sure we meet the skilled labour requirements from province to province,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “I’m confident today’s symposium will result in a regional solution.”

The focus of today’s symposium that has brought together industry, training, and government representatives from across Atlantic Canada, is to plan now to ensure the region has a strong skilled construction workforce when the economy improves.

“These projects coupled with government stimulus will create both employment opportunities and challenges,” said Hilary Howes, Executive Director of the Construction Association of New Brunswick. “We need to ensure we’ve got the workforce in place to keep pace when new construction begins across the region.”

The symposium will discuss solutions to issues identified in the Construction Sector Council’s annual report “Construction Looking Forward.” The report highlights labour market trends from 2009 to 2017 in Atlantic Canada.

The CSC’s forecast identifies several major projects in New Brunswick that are projected to drive employment up 45% over four years starting in 2012. These projects which are now either underway or in the planning stage, include an oil refinery and a nuclear power plant.

The CSC’s forecast also show major resource development projects will create 3,200 new construction jobs over the next 9 years in Newfoundland and Labrador. These planned projects include a nickel processing facility, oil field expansion, mine development and hydro projects. Construction employment growth in this province outpaces all others.

Planned resource related projects and government infrastructure activity will add 2,400 new jobs this year and next in Nova Scotia, offsetting the loss of 1,000 jobs in residential construction.

“Our challenge is attracting new young recruits, training and retaining skilled workers,” said Derm Cain, CSC Board Director and Canadian Regional Director of the International Union of Operating Engineers. “It’s a must, given that 5,900 skilled workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers in Nova Scotia alone.”

The report finds that Atlantic Canada will need more than 4,600 new trades’ people to meet demands for new construction. The age of Atlantic Canada’s workforce is above the national average. As a result, an unprecedented 15,000 workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers between now and 2017.

In Prince Edward Island, the report shows an increase in housing activity and government infrastructure projects will create 320 new construction jobs over the next two years.

Still, both Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island risk losing skilled workers to Newfoundland and Labrador in the short term and New Brunswick in the longer term.

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national organization committed to supporting the future needs of Canada’s construction industry through a highly skilled workforce.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide governments, colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to ensure Canada’s construction industry remains a leading sector in Canada’s economy.

Atlantic Canada’s “Construction Looking Forward” Scenario 2009-2010 will be released in the coming weeks, along with summary from the Atlantic Labour Market Symposium and all forecast scenario data at www.constructionforecasts.ca

For Further Information Contact:

Danna O’Brien
Sussex Strategy Group
(416) 500-0699

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(416) 271-2633

B.C.’s Construction Industry Built to Buffer Recession

May 26, 2009

Construction Sector Front and Centre at Labour Market Symposium

Vancouver – British Columbia’s construction industry will weather the recession better than many other industries thanks to government infrastructure spending, the Construction Sector Council (CSC) announced today at the B.C. Construction Labour Market Symposium. Labour and industry representatives from across the province are meeting to find ways of ensuring this key sector is ready for the next wave of construction.

While the economic downturn has affected residential and commercial construction projects, major projects have been planned in the mining, manufacturing and utility industries.

“According to our scenario, these projects, coupled with the governments’ infrastructure projects will help to boost employment growth in B.C.’s construction industry over the next few years,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “Despite the downturn in the economy, there are opportunities for B.C.’s skilled trades’ workers.”

These are the highlights of the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed forecast of labour market trends from 2009 to 2017 for British Columbia.

Over the short term government-related construction, especially with strong infrastructure stimulus programs, will play an important role in creating employment opportunities. As economic conditions improve with the return of consumer and business confidence, construction activity will expand on several fronts throughout the forecast period.

”We’re fortunate that few sectors will ride out the recession as well as British Columbia’s construction industry,” said Manley McLachlan, President of the BC Construction Association.

The report finds that 26,000 new workers will be required from now until 2017 to replace retiring baby boomers. Another 6,400 workers will be needed to meet the medium to long- term rise in construction activity.

“This is the time for the construction industry to plan for the future,” said Wayne Peppard, Executive Director of the BC Building Trades. “Industry and government must focus on improving skills, increasing mobility, and recruiting young talent so that the construction industry is a driving force through the ups and downs of the economy.”

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national organization committed to supporting the future needs of Canada’s construction industry through a highly skilled workforce.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide governments, colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to ensure Canada’s construction industry remains a leading sector in Canada’s economy.

B.C’s Construction Looking Forward Scenario 2009-2017 will be available in the coming weeks along with a summary from the BC Labour Market Symposium and all forecast scenario data at www.constructionforecasts.ca

For Further Information Contact:

Scott Brownrigg
Sussex Strategy Group
Cell (416) 277- 8847

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
Cell (416) 271-2633

Infrastructure Spending Cushions Construction Industry

March 17, 2009

Ottawa – Initial assessments of the federal government’s stimulus package show it is helping to ease the economic impact of the recession on one of Canada’s most important sectors, according to the Construction Sector Council (CSC).

“We’re confident this $30 billion injection over the next two fiscal years will provide the construction industry with a soft landing during these challenging economic times,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council.”

Right now virtually the entire Canadian construction labour force is in transition as mega projects are delayed from coast to coast and residential spending declines.

The CSC’s analysis shows the fiscal stimulus included in the federal budget, and anticipated in coming provincial initiatives, will boost construction spending and employment over the next three years. It will create the conditions needed to maintain the construction capacity that will be required to respond not only to the stimulus measures but to all future demands for infrastructure development and maintenance as our economy recovers.

“Construction employment is expected to show small gains from 2009 to 2010 and remain unchanged in 2011, and we think that’s a very good sign compared to so many other sectors,” Gritziotis added. Construction employment figures will be detailed in the final CSC national and provincial labour market forecasts available this spring.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, government, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business. Visit our website: www.csc-ca.org.

For Further Information Contact:

George Gritziotis
Construction Sector Council
(905) 569-5552
gritziotis@csc-ca.org

Employment Opportunities in Ontario’s construction industry 74,000 new workers needed over the next eight years

July 11, 2008

Kingston – After a decade of steady growth and employment for many trades at or near record levels in 2007, Ontario’s construction industry is expected to maintain manageable growth that will require the hiring of nearly 74,000 workers over the next eight years, the Construction Sector Council (CSC) says in its fourth annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed forecast of labour market trends from 2008 to 2016 in Ontario.

“While there is some risk of an economic slowdown affecting Ontario, the level of growth for construction over the next 8 years remains very positive,” said Ron Martin, Executive Director of the Sudbury Construction Association. “Major projects underway and proposed will add significant construction related employment in the province.”

Under the current outlook, between 2008 and 2016, as many as 17,600 new workers are required to keep pace with new projects, while another 56,300 workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers.

“And this doesn’t include several major projects that are under review,” noted Ron McGillis, Manager Safety Compliance and Contractor Quality of Ontario Power Generation. “Recent announcements of a nuclear reactor facility, the potential for a new oil refinery in southern Ontario, and increased infrastructure investment will generate added employment opportunities for Ontario workers.”

“For Ontario’s construction industry, it will remain important to promote careers, attract youth and enhance training programs,” said Patrick Dillon, Business Manager of the Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario. “This support is needed both to deepen the ranks of skilled workers for new construction and to replace retiring workers.”

“Addressing the increasing need for more skilled construction workers in Ontario is crucial and we must make recruitment and training a priority,” says Richard Lyall, President of RESCON.

As one of the largest industries in Canada, construction employs more than a million Canadians. National employment across the entire construction industry has risen by a record 39% over the past five years.

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For a copy of the Ontario labour market forecast visit our website: www.csc-ca.org.

For further information contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186 

More than 18,000 Skilled Workers Needed in Atlantic Canada Major New Projects Stretching Available Workforce

June 25, 2008

St. John’s – Major engineering and industrial construction projects In New Brunswick and Newfoundland and Labrador will stretch Atlantic Canada’s workforce to the limit, according to the Construction Sector Council.

“We’ve got a record number of big projects planned or underway in the Atlantic region including a nuclear power plant, oil refinery projects, hydro and highway construction,” said Timothy Flood, President of John Flood and Sons Limited, the oldest construction company in Canada. “These projects require more skilled workers than we have available.”

The information is contained in the Construction Sector Council’s fourth annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed forecast of labour market trends from 2008 to 2016 in Atlantic Canada.

Ongoing construction activity will keep Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island busy but replacing an older than average construction workforce will create a significant challenge towards the end of the forecast.

The report finds that Atlantic Canada will need more than 5,000 new trades people to meet demands for new construction. The age of Atlantic Canada’s workforce is above the national average. As a result an unprecedented 13,600 workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers between now and 2016.

“With so many workers retiring, this makes attracting, training, and retaining skilled workers more important than ever,” said Carol MacCulloch, President of the Construction Association of Nova Scotia.

Major new industrial and engineering projects will require specific skilled trades.

“To remain competitive and attract industrial development we will have to step up training and recruitment efforts to find enough skilled workers to keep up, no doubt about it,” said Dermot Cain, Canadian Director, of the International Union of Operating Engineers.

The boom in large construction projects will also affect residential construction.

“We’ll see a burst in residential building in Atlantic Canada to accommodate workers coming in from out of province, “said Grant MacLeod, President of the PEI Residential Construction Sector Council. It’s a real domino effect.”

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For a copy of the Atlantic labour market forecast visit our website: www.csc-ca.org.

For further information contact:

Bob Collins
Construction Sector Council
(cell) 416-399-0413 

Manitoba’s Building Boom Taps Into Available Skilled Trades Over 10,000 Workers Needed to Keep up with Construction

June 23, 2008

Winnipeg – Robust construction activity across all sectors has pushed employment of the skilled trades’ workforce to record levels according to the Construction Sector Council’s latest forecast.

“Never in the history of the province have we seen so many current and planned projects,” said John Schubert, President of the Winnipeg Construction Association. “Our construction workforce is stretched and attracting more young people, women and Aboriginals into construction trades is a must to keep up.”

The information is contained in the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) fourth annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed forecast of labour market trends from 2008 to 2016 in Manitoba.

Manitoba’s construction industry employs almost 22,000 workers. As many as 6,000 new workers are required to keep pace with new projects. Another 4,500 workers are needed to replace retiring baby boomers between now and 2016.

“We need to recruit and train workers in every sector,” said David Martin, Executive Director of the Manitoba Building and Construction Trades Council. “The challenge now is to make sure apprenticeship and other training programs meet the demand for skilled workers. Many colleges are rising to the challenge with more innovate methods to deliver skills training.”

The report shows an unprecedented number of new construction projects including the Trans Canada and Enbridge pipelines, the Manitoba Floodway and new wind, ethanol, and hydroelectric power plants. In addition, there are a number of infrastructure projects scheduled for development including the Winnipeg water treatment plant and highway construction throughout the province.

“This is great news for Manitoba,” said Mike Moore, President of the Manitoba Home Builders’ Association. “Our residential construction industry continues to grow at an unprecedented rate and employment opportunities are tremendous”.

As one of the largest industries in Canada, construction employs more than a million Canadians. National employment across the entire construction industry has risen by a record 39% over the past five years.

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For a copy of the Manitoba labour market forecast visit our website: www.csc-ca.org

For Further Information Contact:
David Martin
Executive Director
Manitoba Building and Construction Trades Council
(204) 782-3832

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186 

Skilled Trades Workers Returning Home to Saskatchewan Construction at Record Levels with Surge in New Projects

June 10, 2008

Regina – More skilled trades workers are moving back to Saskatchewan to help the construction industry keep pace with record construction activity, according to the latest forecast by the Construction Sector Council.

“Saskatchewan is now a major draw in the fierce Canada-wide competition for skilled labour,” said Michael Fougere, President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association. “With more residents coming back, new immigrants coming in, and apprenticeship programs on the rise, the construction industry is doing everything possible to meet the challenges created by this construction boom.”

The information is contained in the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) fourth annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed forecast of labour market trends from 2008 to 2016 for Saskatchewan.

The report shows that since 2001, Saskatchewan’s construction workforce has grown twice as fast as the overall provincial labour force at 11%. Over the next few years, construction employment will increase by 14% or 3,800 workers. Still another 4,000 workers will be required between now and 2016 to keep pace with retiring baby boomers.

“We’re seeing more residential and non residential projects, and a shift to big resource based industrial and engineering projects,” said Sid Matthews, President of the CLR Construction Labour Relations Association of Saskatchewan Inc. “With more work than workers we have to compete with other provinces for skilled people in just about every construction trade.”

Manufacturing investment in Saskatchewan is at an all time high. Several projects are underway or scheduled, including ethanol and food processing plants, potash and uranium mine expansions. “The surge in industrial and engineering investment in Saskatchewan shows us where the opportunities are,” said Terry Parker, Business Manager of the Saskatchewan Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council. “Apprenticeship programs should be targeted to match emerging demands and attract far more youth, women and Aboriginals.”

Construction activity will remain strong over the next few years.

“That means we have to be more aggressive in promoting careers in construction and making investments in training,” said Alan Thomarat, Executive Vice President of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association - Saskatchewan. “It’s an investment in the people and skills that are in high demand in Canada.”

As one of the largest industries in Canada, construction employs more than a million Canadians. As many as 250,000 construction workers are needed across Canada by 2016 to keep pace with new projects and retirements.

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For a copy of the Saskatchewan labour market forecast visit our website: www.csc-ca.org

For Further Information Contact:
Michael Fougere
Saskatchewan Construction Association
Chair, Saskatchewan LMI Committee
Ph. (306) 525-0171

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
Office (905) 852-9186
Cell (416)-271-2633

Pages