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New workers needed to meet peak labour requirements

March 16, 2011

REGINA − A new forecast scenario for Saskatchewan’s construction industry says a rising demand for potash, oil refinery expansion and a recovery in the housing market are behind the province’s current construction growth, and that demand for labour will peak next year.

“With a strong and growing economy, Saskatchewan continues to be a major attraction for skilled labour,” says Michael Fougere, President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association. “Electricians, estimators, millwrights, boilermakers, heavy equipment operators, and a host of other skilled trades will continue to be in hot demand”.

The Construction Sector Council’s new report, Construction Looking Forward: An assessment of construction labour markets for Saskatchewan from 2011−2019, says demand for potash is behind new mining projects that more than double industrial and engineering investment from 2010 to 2012. Oil refinery expansion and renewable energy projects will also contribute to the demand for a third more non-residential construction workers, while housing expansion is expected to boost employment by 25% in the residential sector.

"The demands in the residential construction industry are escalating in both the new home and renovation sectors," says Alan Thomarat, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association – Saskatchewan. "It is critical to the future of Saskatchewan that appropriate and abundant housing is available to satisfy the growing population and communities. As such all stakeholders must continue to support and build the necessary capacity to train and deliver a professional and skilled workforce," adds Thomarat who also serves as the Chair of the Board for the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology (SIAST).

The report says that though projects wind down between 2013 and 2016, and demand for workers eases, housing leads a recovery with modest growth in commercial and institutional building to stabilize markets by 2018.

Over the forecast scenario period, estimates indicate there will be almost the same number of new workforce entrants coming into the construction workforce (6,600) as there are retirements (6,300), but this conceals the market pressures as current projects approach peak labour demand. Construction will need about 7,000 new workers to meet demand between 2011 and 2013.

“Continued investment in training and apprenticeships, and promoting the industry to youth, Aboriginal people, women, and immigrants are priorities for our industry,” says Terry Parker, Business Manager, Saskatchewan Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council.”

Each year, the CSC compiles nine-year labour forecast scenarios for each province following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The CSC is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION −

Michael Fougere
President
Saskatchewan Construction Association
(306) 525-0171

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Manageable growth for BC’s construction industry over next nine years

February 21, 2011

VANCOUVER − With a few exceptions, BC’s construction industry will grow at a manageable pace for the next several years, thanks mainly to mining and utilities-related projects, and a modest housing recovery.

A new forecast scenario released by the Construction Sector Council, Construction Looking Forward: An assessment of construction labour markets for British Columbia from 2011−2019, says new mining, pipeline and port expansion projects will drive growth until 2015.

Those, along with the construction of several major hydroelectric projects means some trades will see double-digit employment growth between 2011 and 2015. But during the same period, as government stimulus projects wind down, trades heavily involved in road, highway and bridge work will likely see reductions in employment.

“Along with high levels of in-mobility at this time, we will need to continue to focus on training and recruitment to ensure we have the workers required in BC,” says Manley McLachlan, President-CEO, British Columbia Construction Association.

From 2016 to 2019, the industry will again face some employment losses as major projects begin to wind down and residential investment slows. But these losses will be partly offset by retirements from the aging workforce.

“Industry needs to continue to focus on attracting new workers even during periods of limited employment growth. Many of these new workers will be first time new entrants to the labour force and others from outside the industry. Training programs will likely need to expand and adapt to prepare these new workers for the job site.” says Tom Sigurdson, Executive Director, British Columbia and Yukon Building and Construction Trades Council.

During the 2011–2019 period, 31,000 workers exit the workforce due to retirements, and this raises the total labour force requirement to 32,600 workers. Two thirds of these requirements will be filled by an expected 22,400 new entrants to the workforce, leaving a gap of 10,000 workers that will need to be recruited from outside the local construction market to meet labour requirements.

Each year, the CSC compiles nine-year labour forecast scenarios for each province following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The CSC is a national industry/government partnership funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. It is committed to maintaining and developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

MORE INFORMATION --

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Workforce mobility key to meeting Atlantic construction needs

July 21, 2010

A new forecast of labour supply and demand in construction has industry leaders in Canada’s Atlantic provinces preparing for labour market shifts complicated by limited workforce growth. But the report says that despite volatility in specific sectors, employment levels in 2018 will be similar to what they are today.

The Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) new nine-year forecast for New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland and Labrador breaks down labour requirements by trade and province, and includes a summary of major projects.

“Our challenge is to have a steady supply of skilled workers available when and where they are needed,” says George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “To do that, our industry needs to keep promotion and recruitment on the front burner at all times, and encourage mobility within the region.”

The forecast says the industry will see a slight decline in total construction employment estimated at almost 1,500 by the end of the outlook scenario in 2018. Demographics, however, will have a significant impact in Atlantic Canada as the more than 17,000 workers are expected to be lost to retirements and mortality between 2010 and 2018. These will be partially offset by first-time new entrants to the labour force estimated at 11,500, but these will not be sufficient to meet the replacement needs. Industry will need to turn its attention to recruiting workers from other provinces, industries or countries to meet labour requirements.

The complete report for Atlantic Canada is available online at www.csc-ca.org and it includes the following provincial highlights:

  • In New Brunswick, the 2009 recession passed with limited job losses in construction thanks to new housing and ongoing industrial, commercial and institutional projects that kept employment levels relatively high over the past few years. But as these projects end, the stage is set for a downturn in activity that lasts until about 2013. After that, housing and some engineering projects will lead a mild recovery, but employment will be below recent record-high levels at the end of the scenario period.
  • In Nova Scotia, momentum in institutional, utilities and infrastructure work combined to generate construction jobs and avoid the worst impacts of the global recession. With no planned major projects scheduled, employment growth slows as current projects end. Employment levels at the end of the outlook scenario remain close to current levels.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador, by contrast, will experience a downturn in housing construction, though big industrial and utility/resource projects begin to hire and drive a construction cycle to peak demands starting in 2013. Non-residential employment increases by more than 60 percent from 2011 to 2013 for many trades as it rises to peak demand in 2014. After that, employment returns to current levels.
  • Similarly, commercial and industrial projects in Prince Edward Island add jobs, and in 2015, there is a jump in utility-related work.

The CSC compiles reports for each province following consultations with industry leaders, as well as governments and educational institutions. The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. In addition, all scenario-based forecast data is available at www.constructionforecasts.ca.

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national industry organization funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program. The CSC is committed to maintaining and developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For more information, contact:
Rosemary Sparks
Senior Director of Planning and Development
Construction Sector Council
(613) 569-5552

Stimulus and private sector key to construction industry’s resurgence

July 6, 2010

How quickly British Columbia’s construction industry emerges from the steep downturn that began in 2008 will depend on the timing of government stimulus and the resurgence of private-sector-led projects, says a newly released report by the Construction Sector Council (CSC).

In its annual report on the supply and demand for construction labour in B.C., the CSC estimated that construction employment fell by 15 percent with the loss of over 21,000 jobs during the downturn.

“The Home Renovation Tax Credit, and other government investment in social and First Nations public housing infrastructure, have helped labour markets through the downturn. These programs support economic growth and provide opportunities for skilled workers,” says M.J. Whitemarsh, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association of BC, who notes that in general, construction workers faced 10% to 15% job losses (21,000 jobs) in the downturn.

But the provincial Construction Looking Forward report estimates the return of stronger labour markets for much of the forecast period.

“Industry and governments must also consider that the demographic challenge is here today and that we need to continue to address our labour market needs,” says Wayne Peppard, Executive Director of the British Columbia and Yukon Building Trades.

Looking ahead until 2018, the B.C. scenario indicates 28,000 workers will retire, 3,700 positions will be lost due to mortality, and 27,400 new jobs will be created. And it estimates that the 24,000 new entrants will not be enough to meet demand.

“There will not be enough new workers to fill labour requirements, so our priorities will be on recruiting, training and career promotion that targets all potential sources of labour,” says Manley McLachlan, President of the British Columbia Construction Association, who also noted that, “Construction managers, contractors and supervisors will be in high demand throughout most of the forecast period.

The CSC compiles reports for each province following consultations with industry leaders, as well as governments and educational institutions. The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. In addition, all scenario-based forecast data is available at www.constructionforecasts.ca.

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national industry organization funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. The CSC is committed to maintaining and developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For more information, contact:
Alix Russell
Director of Communications
Canadian Home Builders’ Association of BC
(604) 785-2227

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Steady growth keeps skilled trades in demand

June 24, 2010

WINNIPEG – A new forecast says employment in Manitoba’s construction industry will reach record high levels, and skilled tradespeople will be in demand for at least the next eight years. The Construction Sector Council (CSC) report says the recession did not reduce the demand for workers by much, and that steady growth and an aging workforce will limit the available supply from 2010 to 2018.

“Clearly, there will not be enough new entrants to replace retirements and mortality let alone finding workers for new construction projects,” says John Schubert, Chair of the Manitoba Construction Sector Council. “So we are very focused on recruitment and will be increasing our efforts to promote the industry to new entrants, and to invest in apprenticeship. We are also looking at new labour sources from other industries and provinces, and from immigration.”

The CSC compiles Construction Looking Forward reports for each province following consultations with industry leaders as well as governments and educational institutions. They outline labour supply and demand in the provincial industry, and include a ranking system for some 30 trades.

Manitoba is in the middle of a strong construction cycle. Major mining, hydro electric, transmission and other engineering projects will keep construction employment strong throughout the outlook scenario.

Across the forecast period, employment will rise by 6,200 jobs between 2010 and 2018. In addition, there are replacement requirements from 5,300 retirements, and the loss of 900 workers due to the natural mortality rate.

“We aren’t seeing the volatility that we’ve seen in previous cycles, adds David Martin, President of the Manitoba Building Trades. “The data are showing regular, but steady growth. With proper workforce planning, that is quite manageable,” he says, noting that “the forecast allows us to get ahead of the curve and be prepared.”

The CSC compiles reports for each province following consultations with industry leaders, as well as governments and educational institutions. The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at: www.csc-ca.org. In addition, all scenario based forecast data is available at www.constructionforecasts.ca.

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national industry organization funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. The CSC is committed to maintaining and developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For more information, contact:
Taras Luchak
Manitoba Construction Sector Council
(204) 272-5091

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Record high number of construction workers to continue

June 8, 2010

REGINA – Saskatchewan’s construction industry is driving the province’s booming economy, and employment levels are expected to remain at a 30-year high until 2018.

The Construction Sector Council’s just-released forecast of labour supply and demand has industry leaders planning well ahead to deal with a very tight and shifting need for some skilled trades.

The Construction Looking Forward report estimates non-residential employment will grow by more than 50% from 2008 to 2011. The surge in jobs began with industrial, infrastructure and other engineering projects, which more than offset a temporary weakness in housing.

“While we experienced a slight downturn in new home construction, increases in renovation activity in recent months and a resurgence in the new home sector in the first five months of this year are leading the market to show increases in 2010 and 2011,” remarked Alan Thomarat, Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Home Builders’ Association – Saskatchewan.

“Many trades and occupations in the residential sector will find increasing and new opportunities through these changing markets,” Thomarat adds.

More than 7,000 new entrants join the workforce over the 2010-2018 forecast period, but 5,100 retirements are planned and another 1,000 workers will be lost due to the natural mortality rate.

“Meeting this demographic challenge requires the industry working together to replace and sustain our skilled construction workforce,” says Terry Parker, Business Manager, Saskatchewan Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council.

“The projected number of new workers will barely replace what we will lose over the next decade, let alone fill demand for new building,” says Michael Fougere, President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association.

“We’re working with schools and training institutions to promote careers in construction and to target training and apprenticeship programs,” he says.

The CSC compiles reports for each province following consultations with industry leaders, including contractors, owners and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions. The national and regional scenario based forecasts are released annually and are available online at: www.csc-ca.org. In addition, all scenario based forecast data is available at www.constructionforecasts.ca.

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national industry organization funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. The CSC is committed to maintaining and developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For more information, contact:
Michael Fougere
Saskatchewan Construction Association
Co-Chair, Saskatchewan LMI Committee
Ph. (306) 525-0171

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Construction industry leaders say mentorship program can prevent skills drain

February 11, 2010

OTTAWA – Though close to 200,000 construction workers are expected to retire between 2010 and 2018, the industry is taking steps to make sure their skills and knowledge stay at the jobsite.

A national mentoring program, developed by the Construction Sector Council (CSC), and piloted in Saskatchewan last fall, is being lauded by construction industry leaders as the right tool for closing the skills gap that could result from an exodus of experienced, older workers.

“The question we had to address is how will the industry train the next generation?” says CSC Executive Director George Gritziotis. “And since 80% of training takes place on the job, an effective mentoring program will go a long way toward achieving that goal.

“When it comes to construction, nothing can replace on-the-job experience,” adds Paul McLellan, the head of Saskatchewan’s apprenticeship commission. “The mentorship program allows for the transfer of skills, in a systemic way, from one generation of workers to the next. It is relevant to the needs of today’s construction workforce, and easy to put into practice in the workplace.”

McLellan, the CEO of Alliance Energy, says “the benefit of the program is the connection formed between the individuals involved. As with any teacher/student relationship, if properly done, this bond will last forever and provide knowledge transfer through generations.”

The Manitoba Building and Construction Trades Council has been sharing the learner’s handbook, modules, mentor’s handbook and other materials with all sectors of the industry. “The feedback from contractors, workers – everyone really – has been totally positive,” says Executive Director David Martin. “The program can harness valuable skills and knowledge – it’s the right solution at the right time for the construction industry.”

The mentorship program will be rolled out to key stakeholders in the Canadian construction industry over the next few weeks. For details on this and other CSC initiatives, visit the CSC website at www.csc-ca.org.

The Construction Sector Council (CSC) is a partnership between government, business and labour that works to find solutions to human resource issues affecting the construction workforce.

For more information, contact:
Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
Tel.: 905-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

Construction withstands impact of recession

January 11, 2010

OTTAWA – Canada’s construction industry is emerging from the recession relatively unscathed, thanks to its pre-recession record levels of investment and the more recent government stimulus initiatives.

A preview of the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) 2010-2018 scenario-based forecast says that though building and employment decreased from October 2008 to July 2009, employment has been rising since August. This will likely continue because of new infrastructure projects, renovation and maintenance work, and strengthening housing starts.

“Construction didn’t take the recessionary hit that some other industries took, and is well-positioned to lead other sectors out of the recession,” says George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “Government infrastructure projects provided a buffer to offset losses the industry would have felt,” he says. The 2010 CSC scenario assumes that 20 percent of the stimulus spending takes place in 2009, 50 percent in 2010 and the remaining 30 percent in 2011.

The preview shows a varied employment picture across the country, with Ontario, Alberta and British Columbia reporting the greatest decrease in employment in 2009. At the same time, driven by major industrial, engineering and infrastructure projects, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador recorded employment gains over the first 10 months of 2009. Construction investment declined by less than 10 percent in 2009 and will rebound in 2010, surpassing the peak reached in 2008.

“Although construction has experienced a slowdown in varying degrees in some areas of the country, given the promise of the stimulus and the overall strengthening of the economy, it should regain momentum,” says Tim Flood, CSC Business Co-chair and President of John Flood and Sons, a construction company active in commercial, industrial, institutional and
residential construction in New Brunswick.

Engineering construction in roads, bridges and other heavy construction and commercial and institutional building sectors where employment growth is strong through 2010 will create jobs and strong labour markets for a number of trades. These include concrete finishers, non-residential construction estimators and managers, crane operators, heavy equipment operators and mechanics, ironworkers, trades helpers and labourers, and welders.

The oil sands and related development in Alberta and key utility sector projects will be driving work in Quebec, Saskatchewan and Manitoba for several key trades, including construction millwrights, pipefitters, sheet metal workers, ironworkers and welders.

“Recruiting and training need to continue to be top priorities,” says Bob Blakely, CSC Labour Co-chair and Canadian Director of the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO. “We are working to meet the challenge of having enough skilled workers who can shift from a region of under-employment to one where opportunities are more plentiful.”

The Construction Sector Council (CSC) – a partnership between labour, business and government – is a national not-for-profit organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry.

The CSC’s annual Construction Looking Forward national and regional scenario-based forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

Visit www.csc-ca.org to read the 2010-2018 preview of Construction Looking Forward.

For more information, contact:
Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
Tel.: 905-852-9186

Funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

Government stimulus could help Ontario’s construction industry weather the recession

July 8, 2009

135,000 new workers still needed over the next decade

Windsor – Ontario’s construction industry could weather the economic downturn better than many other sectors as proposed government infrastructure spending provides a soft landing according to figures released today in the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) fifth annual edition of “Construction Looking Forward,” a detailed industry outlook scenario of labour market trends from 2009 to 2017 in Ontario.

While the recession has weakened housing and industrial activity, other construction sectors are expected to see employment gains in 2009 and 2010 associated with increased government infrastructure (highway, bridge and other engineering) spending that potentially offsets employment losses.

Over the remainder of the outlook the overall economy recovers and the expected increase in construction activity and the need to replace retiring baby boomers translates into the demand for 135,000 new jobs over the next decade.

“Due to the size and complexity of the Ontario market, there are varying degrees of positive construction employment across the province, with the GTA expecting to realize important gains in the short term,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “Despite the downturn, employment numbers should remain steady as several proposed major infrastructure projects across Ontario come on-line.”

The CSC report breaks down employment needs across five Ontario regions: Northern, Eastern, Western, Central, and the Greater Toronto Area and each have specific circumstances. The GTA will lead the province in construction employment over the next few years as growth remains steady. Other regions of the province however will feel the effects of the recession more strongly over the next three years.

“Transportation and other infrastructure related projects will keep our industry moving in the next few years,” said Rob Bradford, Executive Director of the Ontario Road Builders Association. “Meeting industry’s demand will require a workforce that is flexible as opportunities occur across the province and workers will need to move to where the jobs are.”

Overall construction employment in the CSC trades is expected to increase slightly from 2009 – 2011. From 2012 to 2017, growth in construction employment will average 2.7% annually. These additions to the workforce will come as the overall growth in the Ontario labour force slows to 1% or less. Construction employers will be competing for a steadily growing share of the provincial workforce.

“We need to continue to plan for our existing and future workforce needs,” said Pat Dillon, Business Manager of the Ontario Building and Construction Trades Council. “Governments need to step up apprenticeship and recruitment programs, and put in place measures that include tax relief to facilitate the mobility of our current displaced workforce to ensure that we have the skilled labour ready to take on new projects and replace retiring workers.”

“For Ontario’s construction industry, it remains imperative to promote construction careers, attract youth and enhance training programs,” said Mark Arnone, Director, Projects and Modifications, Ontario Power Generation (Nuclear). “Future major industrial and engineering projects will need a skilled work force to sustain growth and build Ontario’s future.”

The Construction Sector Council is a national organization committed to developing a highly skilled workforce – one that will support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada. Created in April of 2001, and financed by both government and industry, the CSC is a partnership between labour and business.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to support the future needs of the construction industry in Canada.

For a copy of the Ontario labour market forecast visit our website: www.csc-ca.org

For Further Information Contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(416) 271-2633

Manitoba’s Construction Sector Remains Strong

June 25, 2009

Over 10,000 skilled trades’ workers will be needed

Winnipeg – Construction employment in Manitoba is on the rise and will keep growing despite the economic downturn, according to the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC’s) latest forecast.

“This is one sector that’s helping to build Manitoba out of the recession,” said George Gritziotis, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council. “And there’s no letting up. Over ten thousand skilled trades’ workers are needed here over the next 9 years.”

“Construction companies remain in a hiring mode which reflects the positive outlook for the industry,” said John Schubert, President of the Winnipeg Construction Association. “There are terrific career opportunities for Manitoban’s who want to enter the skilled trades.”

Highlights of the Construction Sector Council’s annual report “Construction Looking Forward” for Manitoba show the combination of government stimulus and planned projects, including airport redevelopment, mine upgrades and pipeline conversion, will boost employment in many skilled trades by more than 5% between now and 2011.

“And those figures will keep going up,” said Michael Moore, President of the Manitoba Homebuilders Association. “Housing expansion between 2011 and 2017 is expected to boost employment in key trades by more than 25%. That’s quite a trend.”

The forecast shows an estimated 5,400 construction workers will retire between 2009 and 2017. This is in addition to the 5,300 skilled workers needed to keep up with demand. Rising construction activity will be driven by strong residential investment, and major hydro, mining and pipeline projects.

“The take home message is plan now,” said Dave Martin, Executive Director of the Manitoba Building and Construction Trades Council. “If we step up apprenticeship and recruitment programs, we’re confident more young people will realize there’s a great future in the skilled trades. This is where the jobs are.”

The Construction Sector Council is Canada’s most reliable source for labour market forecasting and commentary. The CSC is a national organization committed to supporting the future needs of Canada’s construction industry through a highly skilled workforce.

The CSC’s “Construction Looking Forward” national and regional forecasts provide governments, colleges, labour and industry with accurate information on labour supply and demand to ensure Canada’s construction industry remains a leading sector in Canada’s economy.

Manitoba’s Construction Looking Forward Scenario 2009-2010 is available along with all forecast scenario data at www.constructionforecasts.ca

For Further Information Contact:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(416) 271-2633

Scott Brownrigg
Sussex Strategy Group
(416) 277-8847

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