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Employment Gains for Ontario’s Construction Industry

March 22, 2012

TORONTO – The next nine years will see steady growth for construction in Ontario. From mining in the North (Ring of Fire) to nuclear power, transportation and other infrastructure projects in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Ontario will be challenged to meet its skilled labour requirements. This increased level of construction activity will come at a time when Ontario will also be feeling the impact of the aging baby boomers.

A new forecast of labour supply and demand, published by the Construction Sector Council (CSC), says construction has been a leading industry for more than 20 years, and while the dynamics will vary by region, employment continues to grow across the outlook scenario.

Employment gains are strongest in the Northern region and in the Greater Toronto Area. The medium/longer term attention is on the Ring of Fire group of mining and infrastructure projects in Northwestern Ontario while, in the Sudbury area and Northeastern Ontario, there are several mining and related infrastructure projects underway now or scheduled to start over the next few years. The mineral deposits represent the long-term potential for continued mining development in Northern Ontario.

In the GTA, electrical utility investments in nuclear facilities will have a major impact on the demand for key trades and occupations as work ramps up after 2014. These requirements combine with institutional projects, such as construction for the Pan American Games, transportation and other infrastructure projects, to create employment opportunities across the outlook scenario.

Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for Ontario, estimates steady employment growth with both residential and non-residential sectors contributing to growth. The construction labour force is estimated to rise by 43,000 workers to meet the demand associated with increased construction activity. In addition, industry will need to replace 77,000 workers that are expected to retire over the next decade. To address expansion and replacement demand requirements, industry will need to recruit an estimated 120,000 new workers to construction.

“There are several major projects proposed in Ontario that will create employment opportunities for youth, Aboriginal people, women and new comers to Canada. The training systems are in place in Ontario to train that future workforce. Providing enough skilled workers is a high priority at a time when an aging construction workforce and resulting retirements will potentially reduce our labour availability,” says Pat Dillon, Business Manager of the Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario.

“Industry must maintain the necessary support systems to recruit, train and retain construction workers across the scenario. This support is essential to meet the challenges to replace skilled workers as they retire,” he adds.

The construction outlook for Ontario describes challenges with different paces of expansion across sectors and regions.

“The impact of shifting patterns of construction employment will depend on the timing of the many proposed electric utilities, infrastructure and transportation projects. Starting up and ramping down these projects will draw and release skilled trades and occupations working across the regions,” says David Brisbin, Executive Director of the Construction Employers Coordinating Council of Ontario. “Our challenge will be to monitor current and proposed projects to ensure we can match the local labour force to emerging demand requirements.”

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org in March/April. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. This website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Patrick Dillon
Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario
(416) 347-8245

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Manitoba to see steady gains in construction employment

March 13, 2012

WINNIPEG – Construction will continue to be a leading industry in Manitoba over the next decade with the new residential home building and electrical utility sectors reaching record high employment levels. Industrial, commercial and institutional construction will also see steady gains.

The Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) just-released Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for Manitoba says that the Manitoba construction industry is entering a second decade of strong expansion. Strong gains in both residential and non-residential markets will keep unemployment rates low, and industry may face challenges meeting the expanding demand requirements over the next several years.

“Residential construction continues to grow, creating significant employment opportunities,” says Mike Moore, President of the Manitoba Home Builders’ Association. “We will need to actively recruit and train new workers to keep pace with the anticipated 40 percent increase in residential employment.”

For non-residential construction, activity continues to exhibit steady growth driven by a number of major utilities projects underway and scheduled. “The proposed construction projects translate into strong demand requirements with industry facing the risk of potential skill shortages and recruiting challenges over the next few years,” says Dave Martin, Executive Director of the Allied Hydro Council of Manitoba.

“Industry stakeholders will need to carefully manage worker mobility, not only across projects, but across provinces,” he says, noting that “the industry has experience in the recent past with recruiting skilled workers from other markets.”

The construction labour force is estimated to rise by 9,100 workers from 2012 to 2020 in response to increased construction activity, and 6,900 workers are expected to retire. Industry will need to recruit 16,000 workers over the next decade to meet industry demand requirements. Sustained recruiting efforts that target a variety of sources, including youth, women, Aboriginal people, other industries and immigrants will continue to be a priority for the industry.

“Clearly, labour markets will continue to be tight and stakeholders are focusing on apprenticeship, industry training and immigration processes to help meet emerging requirements,” says Ron Hambley, Executive Vice President of the Winnipeg Construction Association. “These types of programs must remain a priority, as construction will be in competition with other industries and regions for workers.”

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecast scenarios following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org in March/April. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. This website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

Dave Martin
Allied Hydro Council of Manitoba
(204) 782-3832

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Mobile workforce, training, key to meeting construction labour needs in BC

March 6, 2012

VANCOUVER, BC – The demand for workers in BC’s construction industry will fluctuate over the next decade, depending on the region and sector. The projected increase in industrial and engineering investment will drive construction markets across the outlook scenario and the overall trend is toward near-record levels of employment.

A new forecast of labour supply and demand has just been released by the Construction Sector Council (CSC), and industry stakeholders are already making use of it to plan ahead.

“The keys to managing the industry’s needs are mobility and flexibility of the workforce, and skilled-worker training,” says Clyde Scollan, President of the Construction Labour Relations Association of BC. “As conditions shift, the increased activity will create distinct opportunities and challenges for BC’s construction industry.”

The new report, Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for British Columbia, says non-residential work is unevenly distributed across regions, with the mining, pipeline, industrial and utility projects in the north dominating gains for the next few years, while commercial, institutional and civil work is weaker in the south.

“Industry will need to meet labour demand requirements through worker mobility, including regional moves by workers within the province – south to north and potentially workers from outside our province or country to meet peak demands,” added Scollan.  “Both short- and long-term worker training will have to be a focus to help meet the labour demand on the industrial and engineering projects in remote areas.”   

For the residential sector, steady gains in employment are projected across the outlook scenario between 2012 and 2020.

“There is renewed growth toward the end of this decade,” says MJ Whitemarsh, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association of BC, “driven by stronger population growth, increased household formation and new housing starts.”

“Industry must continue efforts to ensure the existing workforce and new entrants have the skills to keep our industry productive,” she says.

The report estimates that the province’s construction labour force requirements will rise by 11,000 positions from 2012 to 2020 due to increased construction activity, plus a further 33,200 workers are expected to retire.  Industry will need to recruit more than 44,000 workers over the next decade to meet industry demand requirements. Sustained recruiting efforts that target a variety of sources, including youth, Aboriginal people, women, other industries and immigrants will continue to be a priority for the industry.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org this spring. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

Clyde Scollan
Construction Labour Relations Association of BC
(604) 802-0856

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Saskatchewan construction sets record employment growth

February 27, 2012

REGINA – Saskatchewan is leading other provinces in construction employment growth, and though it has attracted more new workers than most provinces, industry leaders say meeting labour needs over the next decade remains a challenge.

“We have to continue to attract a large, skilled workforce in Saskatchewan to meet market demand, and keeping them may be a challenge,” says Michael Fougere, President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association. “We have been successful at drawing in workers from other sectors and provinces, but we will have to continue efforts to recruit and maintain skilled workers through apprenticeship, industry training and immigration.”

Fougere is responding to a just-released forecast of construction labour supply and demand published by the Construction Sector Council (CSC). The report says that since 2001, the construction workforce has expanded by almost 70 percent. Demand is projected to continue to grow over the next few years. “Our challenge going forward is that the same skilled trades are in demand at the same time for other resource projects across Canada,” he says.

Construction Looking Forward, An Assessment of Construction Labour Markets from 2012 to 2020 for Saskatchewan says the strongest growth is due to the big mining and utility projects, but employment in all sectors will continue to increase. “Unlike most other provinces, new housing construction and renovation work will likely continue at a steady pace until 2020,” says Alan Thomarat, President of the Canadian Home Builders Association of Saskatchewan. “There are concerns about the potential demand for skilled workers due to retirements and competition for labour from other provinces. The entire construction industry is taking a proactive approach to recruitment, retention, training and development.”

Since 2001, Saskatchewan’s labour force has increased from around 23,000 workers to an estimated 37,500 in 2011. Work on known major projects is expected to peak in 2013 and the workforce will decline to average 35,000 workers across the outlook period, well above historic levels.

“This is a new level of activity for our province. We have to ensure that we have the skilled workforce now and for the future,” says Terry Parker, Business Manager of the Saskatchewan Provincial Building & Construction Trades Council, noting that as activity peaks, industry must focus on the potential loss of skilled workers expected to retire over the next decade. The CSC estimates that 6,600 workers may retire; 18 percent of the current workforce.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org in February/March. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

Warren Douglas
Construction Labour Relations Association of Saskatchewan
(306) 352-7909

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Construction industry leaders to release new forecast for Saskatchewan

February 24, 2012

REGINA, SK – Construction industry leaders will release highlights from a new forecast of labour supply and demand from now until 2020. The report − Construction Looking Forward: An assessment of construction labour markets for Saskatchewan from 20122020 − was prepared by the Construction Sector Council in consultation with industry and others. It includes a construction investment outlook and a breakdown of labour needs by trade.

When:   Monday, February 27, 2012, 10am
Where:  Saskatchewan Construction Association, 1939 Elphinstone St. (Boardroom), Regina
Who:     Spokespersons include:

  • Warren Douglas, Executive Director,  Construction Labour Relations Association of Saskatchewan Inc. – Introductions
  • Michael Fougere, President, Saskatchewan Construction Association – Non-residential outlook
  • Alan Thomarat, Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Home Builders of Saskatchewan – Residential outlook
  • Paul McLellan, Board Director, Construction Sector Council, Chief Executive Officer, Alliance Energy Ltd. – National outlook

MORE INFORMATION:

Warren Douglas
Secretariat
Construction Sector Council Saskatchewan
(306) 352-7909

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

320,000 construction workers needed in next decade: mobility and outreach to all sources of labour will be key to meeting needs

June 21, 2011

OTTAWA − Canada’s construction industry will need about 320,000 workers over the next nine years to meet demand for new construction and to replace retirements and mortalities.

The finding, from the Construction Sector Council’s just-released national forecast of labour supply and demand from 2011–2019, says Canada’s slowing population growth combined with its rising demand for large natural resource construction projects is challenging the industry to find the required number of skilled workers.

But it’s a challenge industry leaders are prepared for: “We are making an all-out effort to recruit from non-traditional labour sources such as youth, women, Aboriginal people, workers from other industries and foreign workers,” says George Gritziotis, Executive Director, Construction Sector Council (CSC). “We’re working on government and industry programs that focus on recruitment, apprenticeship and training, certification, pan-Canadian standards and foreign credential recognition.”

The forecast estimates that half of the industry’s total labour needs will be met with 163,000 first-time new entrants to the workforce, leaving a requirement of 157,000 workers − an average of about 15,000 workers per year over the 2011–2019 period.

Demographic patterns are slowing growth by limiting the available workforce and restricting housing starts. At the same time, government and industry are planning large resource projects in response to domestic needs and international demands.

Industry leaders are also looking to manage labour supply and demand, where possible, through interprovincial mobility.

“A ripple effect will be created across all the provinces as major projects from Newfoundland and Labrador to British Columbia first draw in and then release large numbers of key trades,” explains Gritziotis. “For example,” he says, “one of the most likely opportunities to balance markets comes late in the forecast, when the announced utility project in the Greater Toronto Area and major projects in Alberta will likely draw in workers as major projects end in other provinces.”

The forecast for most provinces includes declining employment in residential construction, with steady but limited growth in renovations and repairs.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The CSC is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION −

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Major construction projects drive Ontario building skyward until 2019

May 24, 2011

TORONTO − Big industrial and utility projects will drive construction employment to near record highs in Ontario over the next few years. Building will expand steadily until 2019, though gains will not be distributed evenly throughout the province and will cause some volatility in regional housing markets.

A new forecast scenario published by the Construction Sector Council (CSC) says an estimated 60,000 new workforce entrants are expected to join the province’s construction workforce over the next nine years. But the industry will still need to recruit almost 100,000 more to meet demand and to compensate for the 73,000 retirements.

The large size of the Ontario construction market conceals the impact of major projects on regional construction markets, says George Gritziotis, CSC Executive Director, noting that local housing cycles and the start and end of big industrial and utility projects create distinct peaks and troughs in each region. “But changes will be dominated by the big projects planned for the GTA,” he adds.

Construction Looking Forward: An assessment of construction labour markets from 2011-2019 for Ontario says both residential and non-residential construction are on a gradual upward track, with proposed industrial, commercial, institutional, mining and utilities projects leading the way. Expansion of public transit in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and parts of Central Ontario, new mining facilities in Northern Ontario, building related to the 2015 Pan American games, and investments in energy infrastructure such as nuclear plants are among the major projects.

“The demand for construction skilled trades and occupations are expected to grow over the next nine years,” says Mark Arnone, Vice President, Refurbishment Execution, Ontario Power Generation, “but for those working on the nuclear plants, supply will be particularly tight.”

“As we look forward, recruitment, technical and safety training are and will continue to be top priorities,” says Patrick Dillon, Business Manager/Secretary Treasurer, Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario. “Providing enough qualified skilled workers to meet building demands is the key to a thriving industry, and that’s where our focus is.”

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecast scenarios for each province following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions. The Ontario report details the supply and demand for labour of each of the province’s five regions: GTA, Central, Eastern, Northern and Southwestern.

The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The CSC is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

New tool helps construction connect with immigrant workers

May 16, 2011

OTTAWA − As the traditional construction workforce shrinks, new resources such as the Construction Employer’s Roadmap from the Construction Sector Council (CSC) can help industry leaders connect with immigrant workers to meet growing labour needs.

“The industry is growing steadily, but over the next decade, construction will lose a quarter of its workforce thanks to retirements,” says CSC Executive Director George Gritziotis, pointing to the organization’s latest Construction Looking Forward forecast reports.

“Though a growing labour pool of skilled immigrant workers are available to help replenish the workforce, recruiting and retaining these workers is sometimes a challenge for employers,” he says.

Among other things, the new guide book is geared to helping employers and others involved in human resources management navigate government programs, assess foreign credentials, and help immigrant workers put their best foot forward when seeking opportunities to work in construction.

A Construction Employer’s Roadmap provides employers with information on the role of employment agencies and immigration consultants, and provides an overview of Canada’s immigration programs and the different paths open to permanent residents, temporary residents and workers outside of Canada. The roadmap offers advice on how to assess experience obtained in other countries, make job offers, develop orientation programs and retain workers.

Funded by the Foreign Credential Referral Office of Citizenship and Immigration Canada, the booklet is available in hard copy and electronically with hyperlinks to other useful resources and websites.
 
“The Government of Canada is proud to support the work of the Construction Sector Council, as we know that within the next few years, most of Canada’s labour force growth will come from immigration,” said Jason Kenney, Minister of Immigration, Citizenship and Multiculturalism. “Attracting and retaining the best international talent to address existing and future labour market challenges is critical to our economic success.”

“Immigrant workers can bring many benefits to the industry,” says Gritziotis, “such as the ability to speak different languages, a knowledge of new cultures, and a network of connections − all of which can help employers to compete in new markets.

“With the proper tools to help them integrate, they will sustain one of Canada’s leading industries well into the future.”  

The CSC is a national industry/government partnership funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program. For more information on these and other CSC products and services, visit www.csc-ca.org.

MORE INFORMATION:  

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(416) 271-2633
Cell (613) 266-4230

Atlantic construction leaders prepare for growth as population declines

April 19, 2011

Ottawa − Atlantic Canada’s construction industry will see moderate to record growth over the next several years. The key focus will be on Newfoundland and Labrador where the dramatic ramping up of major industrial and utility/resource projects will challenge the construction industry’s ability to meet demand for non-residential trades and occupations. Limited population and labour force growth across the Atlantic region may complicate managing the peak labour requirements for these projects.

In New Brunswick construction employment reached a record high in 2010, up by 25% compared to 2008. Going forward, however, employment is estimated to decline as current projects wind down.

Nova Scotia’s construction industry will experience moderate growth across the scenario. Employment in non-residential construction hit a record high in 2010 and is estimated to remain at near current levels until 2013 before activity declines as major industrial and engineering projects end.

For PEI, current levels of construction activity are high by historical standards. Job gains are strongest in industrial and engineering projects, ramping up employment by as much as 30% in some trades and occupations.

Those are among the highlights in the latest nine-year forecast of labour supply and demand released by the Construction Sector Council. Construction Looking Forward: An assessment of construction labour markets from 2011 to 2019 for Atlantic Canada says meeting peak demand for major projects will require mobility across the region and likely recruiting from outside the local labour market. In addition, the long-term demographic trends point to the need for industry to retain focus on attracting new recruits even during periods of limited employment growth.

 “These workforce fluctuations require considerable effort to manage because they are unfolding in a regional economy with an older age profile and declining population trends,” says Tim Flood, President, John Flood and Sons (1961) Ltd. Over the forecast scenario an estimated 17,000 workers are expected to retire, 26% of the region’s current construction labour force.

“In addition to sustaining training and recruitment initiatives – particularly campaigns to attract and retain local youth − there are several options for filling these gaps, including more women, Aboriginal people, and temporary or permanent immigration,” says Tim Flood, President, John Flood and Sons (1961) Ltd.

“The construction cycles in the four provinces may also allow provinces to take advantage of interprovincial mobility,” adds Dave Wade, Executive Director, Newfoundland & Labrador Building and Construction Trades Council. “Regional collaboration will be an important part of addressing labour requirements going forward."

Construction Looking Forward reports, which detail workforce supply and demand by trade, province and region, help industry, training providers and government decision makers manage workforce requirements. They are released annually following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The CSC is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

Available at www.constructionforecasts.ca, the forecasts allow for instant access to information on the availability of trades, as well as residential and non-residential construction investment data.

FOR MORE INFORMATION −

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Eight-year growth spurt for Manitoba’s construction industry

April 19, 2011

WINNIPEG − Manitoba’s construction industry will grow steadily over the next several years, with employment peaking in 2014 and remaining high until 2019. A new forecast scenario from the Construction Sector Council (CSC) − Construction Looking Forward: An assessment of construction labour markets for Manitoba from 2011 to 2019 – says the growth is driven by last year’s strong rebound in residential building and by hydroelectric power projects.

Employment is estimated to increase by more than 20% between 2011 and 2014, with boilermakers, carpenters, estimators, managers, millwrights, and electricians in tight supply. And some trades, including heavy equipment operators and truck drivers will need to shift gears − so-to-speak − as the stimulus-related road projects wind down and the utilities projects get underway.

Michael Moore, President of the Manitoba Homebuilders Association says the high levels of migration into Manitoba have triggered the residential investment growth, which is expected to continue over the forecast period. “The pace of residential expansion makes recruiting a challenge, especially for trades and occupations heavily involved in new construction such as carpenters, electricians, plasterers and plumbers,” he says. “But thanks to this type of forecast tool, we can plan ahead to better manage workforce supply and demand.”

The report says an estimated 6,000 new workforce entrants will join the construction industry, but that retirements will also reduce it by about 6,400. New construction means a balance of about 4,600 workers will need to be recruited from outside the local market.

“The need to attract skilled workers from other industries and provinces, when others are also competing for these skills, highlights the importance of our continued career promotion to attract youth, women, Aboriginal people, and immigrants," says John Schubert, Principal, McCaine Electric Ltd. "We also need to expand and adapt our training and apprenticeship programs to attract these workers.”

Each year, the CSC compiles nine-year labour forecast scenarios for each province following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional scenario-based forecasts are released annually and are available online at www.csc-ca.org. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. They allow for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The CSC is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada's Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION −

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

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