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Construction industry gets a boost with new organization BuildForce Canada

April 3, 2013

OTTAWA – Construction industry leaders from across the country have formed a new national organization to help keep a steady flow of highly skilled workers available to the growing industry.

BuildForce Canada opened its doors on April 1, 2013, replacing the Construction Sector Council (CSC) after 10 years of operations working with industry to provide credible, well-respected labour market forecasting and other resources and services.

“In the wake of the end of the federal government’s Sector Council Program, industry leaders have stepped up to the plate,” says Executive Director Rosemary Sparks. “We have a new brand, a new Board of Directors, a new funding model and a new governance structure,” she says. “But our mandate will continue to address the need for a skilled workforce in the construction industry.”

“The products and services that have helped the industry thrive over the past decade, such as the annual labour market forecasts, will continue to be a priority,” says board member Mark Arnone, Vice President of Refurbishment Execution, Ontario Power Generation, noting that the Construction Looking Forward reports, which look ahead nine years, have been key in helping businesses across the country plan for and manage workforce requirements.

“As we continue to experience strong construction markets and growing demand for skilled labour, the industry clearly requires comprehensive labour market information,” says board chair Robert Blakely, Director of Canadian Affairs for the Building and Construction Trades Department AFL CIO. “We will build on the model we have set up to deliver that information, which includes consultation with many diverse stakeholders.”

“BuildForce Canada is an innovative organization and we will be unveiling other exciting projects as we determine priorities over the coming months,” adds Blakely.

Board member John Schubert, President of McCaine Electric Ltd., stressed that priorities will continue to be decided based on research: “We will continue to determine what is needed by looking at human resource issues in a thoughtful, planned and scientific way.”

“Experience with the CSC has also shown that the consensus approach to solutions works best. By working together we can and have accomplished more than any one organization ever could,” adds Schubert.

The new BuildForce Canada Board of Directors has broad representation from the construction industry and its members include contractors, labour groups and owner/client companies.

 “Construction is the backbone of the Canadian economy, and a highly skilled workforce is the backbone of the industry,” concludes Sparks. “The mandate and structure of BuildForce Canada reflect that.”

Located in Ottawa, Ontario, BuildForce Canada (www.buildforce.ca) is a national industry-led organization committed to working directly with the construction industry to provide information and resources to assist with the management of its workforce requirements.

Board of Directors:

  • Arnone, Mark, Vice President, Refurbishment Execution, Ontario Power Generation
  • Blakely, Robert, Director of Canadian Affairs, Building and Construction Trades Department AFL CIO
  • Cochrane, Bob, Executive Liaison to Government and Industry, JV Driver Projects
  • Dillon, Patrick, Business Manager / Secretary Treasurer, Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario
  • Flood, J. Timothy, President, John Flood and Sons (1961) Ltd.
  • Heinen, Dick, Executive Director, Christian Labour Association of Canada
  • Kucheran, Robert, General Vice President – Canadian Region, International Union of Painters and Allied Trades
  • Miller, Dean, General Manager, Business Services Oil Sands Project Development and Execution, Nexen Inc.
  • Oakey, Terrance, President, Merit Canada
  • Ringrose, Barry, General Manager, Major Projects Construction, Suncor Energy
  • Schubert, John, President, McCaine Electric Ltd.
  • Taylor, Christina, Manager, Labour Relations and Workforce Development, Irving Oil

Funded in part by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:

Rosemary Sparks
Executive Director
BuildForce Canada
905-852-9186
www.buildforce.ca

Planning, recruitment, training key to meeting national construction needs

March 26, 2013

New report says challenges continue, as baby boomers leave the workforce

OTTAWA– A just-released forecast of labour supply and demand says construction will need to recruit more than 250,000 workers, including the traditional number of new entrants to the workforce, to meet building needs from now until 2021.

A large portion of this need (about 210,000) is to replace retiring workers, according to the Construction Looking Forward, National Summary, 2013–2021, published by the Construction Sector Council.

“But these numbers conceal important ups and downs happening in different construction sectors and in different regions of the country,” says Rosemary Sparks, Executive Director of the Construction Sector Council, stressing “the increased importance of labour market planning.”

The report does indicate that institutional and commercial building provide steady year-by-year growth in most provinces, but big resource projects, including electrical generation and transmission, mining, and oil and gas pipelines create more volatility in industrial and utility construction.

“We must be able to supply the needed skills when and where required,” continues Sparks. “This includes having access to a mobile workforce at times. It also means working to retain experienced workers and training the next generation. These challenges will continue to focus attention on training, labour mobility and immigration.”

In terms of regional differences, Construction Looking Forward says British Columbia, Alberta, and Ontario are moving into a new expansion that will raise employment by 2021. Manitoba and Prince Edward Island expand, but at a slower pace, across the scenario period. In all of these provinces, new jobs are being added on top of all-time record high employment.

Key resource projects have been ramping up employment in Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador, which will reach a peak over the next two years, but still settle well above pre-2009 industry norms.

Though Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia have limited year-to-year changes in total construction employment, they may face labour challenges nonetheless that will require recruitment from outside the industry.

The forecast says residential construction employment is largely unchanged from 2013 to 2021.

Limited population growth from 2013 to 2021 keeps growth in new home building below previous levels. There are important variations across the provinces. Early on, for example, housing in Ontario is expected to decline, while in Manitoba and Saskatchewan this will not be a factor.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecast scenarios following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions. The full national and regional reports will be available online at www.constructionforecasts.ca/products in March 2013.

Forecast scenario data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. In addition to information on the supply and demand of skilled trades, the website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data.

FOR MORE INFORMATION –

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
905-852-9186

Moving skilled workers to major projects key to meeting Ontario construction needs

March 21, 2013

TORONTO – Northern Ontario and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) will be hubs of construction activity over the next few years, drawing in workers from outside Ontario’s regions to meet the growing demand for skilled trades.

A newly released labour market forecast from the Construction Sector Council says requirements diverge across Ontario, depending on the timing and scale of major projects, but that overall, the industry may need to recruit about 40,000 workers from outside the province.

“Each region has distinct patterns of construction activity,” says David Brisbin, Executive Director of the Construction Employers Coordinating Council of Ontario. “A lot depends on the location, timing and scale of mining, utility and infrastructure projects… Next to finding enough workers for those projects, the challenge will be moving these specialized and experienced trades to the big projects at the right time.”

Construction Looking Forward, Ontario 2013–2021 highlights the labour market situation in each of the province’s five regions.

The report says GTA labour requirements are driven largely by the nuclear power plant refurbishment, transmission, other utilities work and transportation projects.

Northern Ontario is in the midst of a resource development boom, with many major mining and infrastructure projects underway and more being proposed, driving demand for specialized skilled trades up by 65 percent.

Central Ontario labour markets remain more or less balanced, with a shallow expansion.

There is little change in construction employment over the 2013–2021 period in Eastern Ontario; the only consistent source of rising demand being commercial building.

By contrast, a stop-go-stop pattern in Southwestern Ontario, including highway work, the Windsor Bridge, and utility projects, creates some volatility for key trades and occupations.

The forecast scenario estimates that retirements will take about 75,000 workers out of the market between 2013 and 2021, though 55,000 first-time new entrants are estimated to enter construction during this same period. The number of first-time new entrants is based on historical levels and this may be a challenge as construction will be competing against other sectors facing similar demographics.

“With a large proportion of today’s workforce heading into retirement, successful recruitment strategies aimed at youth, women, Aboriginal people and immigrants are key to replacing them,” says Patrick Dillon, Business Manager/Secretary Treasurer of the Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario.

“Training and apprenticeship programs and organizations like the Ontario College of Trades, which was established to work with industry to address current and future labour force requirements, are also a priority,” he added.

New housing activity has been on a strong recovery since 2009, but a mild decline is expected in 2013. It then turns up slightly in 2016, but remains below the record highs of 2007.

The overall downturn in housing is due mostly to slowing population growth and a subsequent change in the type of houses being built. Even during periods of slower growth, recruiting and training initiatives remain important to ensure the skilled workforce is available to meet current and future needs.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecast scenarios following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions. The full national and regional reports will be available online at www.constructionforecasts.ca/products in March 2013.

Forecast scenario data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. In addition to information on the supply and demand of skilled trades, the website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data.

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

David Brisbin, Construction Employers Coordinating Council of Ontario
905-677-6200

Patrick Dillon, Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council of Ontario
416-347-8245

Rosemary Sparks, Construction Sector Council
905-852-9186

Construction continues strong in Saskatchewan; mapping projects key to managing trade demands

March 19, 2013

REGINA, SK – Non-residential construction growth in Saskatchewan has been leading the country and other industries over the past decade, and that is not about to change – at least for the next couple of years.

The latest forecast of labour supply and demand just released by the Construction Sector Council says several large projects now underway and proposed in mining, electrical utilities, pipelines and other industries will keep the industry booming until 2015. At this peak in 2015, construction employment will be more than 60 percent above historical levels.

But similar projects around the same time in other provinces create a competing demand for key trades, according to Construction Looking Forward, Saskatchewan 2013–2021. These include boilermakers, carpenters, contractors and supervisors, crane operators, insulators, ironworkers, sheet metal workers, steamfitters and pipefitters, and welders.

Construction Looking Forward also notes that several major mining projects are currently under review that could increase labour demand later in the forecast period. Otherwise, demand will decrease after 2015 but will still remain at record high levels.

“Saskatchewan is part of the growing centres of resource construction across Canada. Based on the known projects, we see a peak in 2015, but it is also anticipated that resource development opportunities will continue later in the scenario period,” says Doug Folk, Acting President of the Saskatchewan Construction Association.

“This, combined with the estimated retirements of 7,200 skilled workers between now and 2021, and the potential draw of tradespeople to work in other parts of the country may create challenges to maintain and replace the workforce to meet future demand,” Folk adds.

“Industry leaders plan to keep apprenticeship training front and centre, and work on recruitment strategies to attract youth, women, Aboriginal people, and immigrants,” says Terry Parker, Business Manager, Saskatchewan Provincial Building & Construction Trades Council.

The report notes that general economic conditions and population growth has raised both housing starts and overall residential investment to more than twice the levels that prevailed at the start of the last decade.

“Housing-related employment is expected to hold at current levels through 2015,” says Alan Thomarat, President and CEO of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association – Saskatchewan.

“Recruitment and training initiatives to ensure we sustain the necessary capacity to deliver a skilled workforce remain a high priority to meet ongoing housing needs and to address the expected retirements of existing skilled workers,” Thomarat adds.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecast scenarios following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions. The full national and regional reports will be available online at www.constructionforecasts.ca/products in March 2013.

Forecast scenario data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. In addition to information on the supply and demand of skilled trades, the website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data.

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION

Warren Douglas
Executive Director
Construction Labour Relations Association of Saskatchewan Inc.
306-352-7909

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
905-852-9186

Managing worker mobility key to meeting BC construction needs

March 19, 2013

VANCOUVER, BC – Over the next decade or so, construction industry growth in British Columbia will be concentrated in utility and mining projects, mostly in the North. And all eyes will be on the potential for inter-provincial mobility to meet the demand for skilled trades.

“The question being asked is whether tradespeople from Southern BC will move to the work in the North and to what extent will their skills be portable to large industrial and engineering projects,” says Clyde Scollan, President of the Construction Labour Relations Association of BC.

It’s a question the just-released labour market forecast scenario published by the Construction Sector Council attempts to address with details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years.

Construction Looking Forward, British Columbia 2013–2021 says the number of resource projects expected over the next few years is larger than in previous years, and with the baby boom generation approaching retirement, meeting demand for some skilled trades at peak times will be a challenge.

The largest number of projects will get underway in 2014, and continue for three or four years afterward.

The mostly mining, pipeline, LNG terminals, electrical generation plants and transmission line projects translate into high demand for boilermakers, carpenters, contractors and supervisors, crane operators, insulators, ironworkers, sheet metal workers, steamfitters and pipefitters, and welders.

These trades will also be required for a long list of projects across Canada that build up through 2014 to 2015, and coincide with activity in British Columbia. Industry leaders are also looking at other provinces and industries to help balance requirements.

“Up-to-date labour market information is critical for managing skilled worker requirements regionally and nationally,” says Manley McLachlan, President-CEO of the British Columbia Construction Association.

“We must be as strategic in planning the development of our industry’s labour resources as we are in developing our country’s natural resources,” he adds.

“Industry leaders are also focusing on continued investment in apprenticeships and other types of training and support systems to keep pace with demand, as well as outreach to youth, women, Aboriginal people and immigrants” to address the replacement demand created by the retirement of an estimated 32,000 skilled tradespeople in British Columbia, says Tom Sigurdson, Executive Director of the British Columbia and Yukon Building and Construction Trades Council.

Another key highlight of the scenario, which is almost unique to the province, is that the amount of housing-related work will continue to climb until 2017.

MJ Whitemarsh, CEO of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association of British Columbia attributes increased residential construction to the province’s projected population growth and strong immigration record.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecast scenarios following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions. The full national and regional reports will be available online at www.constructionforecasts.ca/products in March 2013.

Forecast scenario data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. In addition to information on the supply and demand of skilled trades, the website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data.

Funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

Clyde Scollan
Construction Labour Relations Association of BC
604-524-4911

Manley McLachlan
British Columbia Construction Association
250-475-1077

Tom Sigurdson
British Columbia and Yukon Building and Construction Trades Council
778-397-2220

MJ Whitemarsh
Canadian Home Builders’ Association of British Columbia
604-818-0449

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
905-852-9186

Construction in Canada enters 2nd decade of strong growth

April 19, 2012

Priority on recruiting, training and managing trade mobility for resource projects

Construction employment will remain at all-time record high levels in Canada for the next decade or so, according to a new forecast of labour supply and demand published by the Construction Sector Council (CSC).

Canada will need an estimated 319,000 new construction workers from 2012 to 2020 to keep pace with increased construction demand and to compensate for the rising number of expected retirements, says the national summary report, Construction Looking Forward, 2012–2020 Key Highlights.

“As the industry enters this second decade of strong growth, stakeholders are drawing on past experience to find ways to meet future demand,” says CSC Business Co-chair Tim Flood, President of John Flood and Sons (1961) Ltd. “Recruiting for the projects is the first priority, but there is a second, critical challenge related to training and retaining workers to meet current needs as well as long-term needs.”

“The industry is working to ensure that investments in apprenticeships and other types of training and support systems keep pace with demand,” he says.

According to the forecast report, the national construction labour force is estimated to rise by 100,000 workers between 2012 and 2020 to meet demand associated with increased construction activity. Much of the expansion will be driven by major projects in non-residential construction and, more specifically, by large industrial and engineering projects. With the exception of a few provinces, residential construction markets continue to recover at a slower pace compared to previous peak levels of activity and employment.

Meanwhile, industry faces the added challenge associated with replacing an aging workforce and the accelerating loss of the baby boomer generation due to retirement. Canada wide, an estimated 219,000 workers are expected to retire. This means that construction will need to replace more than 20 percent of its current workforce over the next decade.

“Industry promotion is a high priority, as we will need to tap into all potential sources of labour supply to meet growing needs. Increased efforts will aim at attracting youth, women, Aboriginal people, other industries and immigrants,” says Flood.

CSC Labour Co-chair Robert Blakely, Director of Canadian Affairs for the Building and Construction Trades Department AFL-CIO says, “Another major challenge for human resource managers will be in tracking the mobility of the key non-residential trades across regions and potentially from abroad.”

This year’s forecast highlights a new dimension in the national competition for skilled workers that focuses on specialized labour markets created by the increase in resource projects such as mining, oil and gas, pipelines, electrical generation and transmission.

“Many of these projects are in remote, northern locations,” continues Blakely, “but the scale of this work generates significant demand requirements across many provinces.” Mapping the proposed start-up of large major projects in some regions and the winding down of projects in others will be critical for assessing the potential for inter-provincial mobility to meet peak demand requirements. Key challenges will be identifying the availability of workers, the portability of skills and their willingness to work in remote areas.

Regionally, Prince Edward Island, Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta and British Columbia follow the overall national pattern of recovery and expansion across the outlook period. Employment in some regions grows as much as 20 percent from 2012 to 2020. Saskatchewan and Newfoundland and Labrador report very strong employment growth, and at peak times, major resource projects exhaust the available workforce for some skilled trades and occupations in these provinces. Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia report more moderate year-to-year changes in total construction employment.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org this spring. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. The website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Construction employment continues to break records in PEI

March 27, 2012

CHARLOTTETOWN, PEI – Prince Edward Island will see continued investment in utilities and commercial, industrial and institutional building projects over the next decade or so, and construction employment will grow beyond record levels.

That’s a key finding in the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) latest forecast of workforce supply and demand: Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for Prince Edward Island.

The forecast says that in the short term, job gains in the non-residential sector will help to offset weaker conditions in new housing construction, and in road, highway and bridge construction. It notes, however, that both residential and new highway work will return later in the outlook scenario.

“Employers, human resource planners and trainers are keeping a close eye on these and other shifting labour requirements,” says Grant MacLeod, Co-owner of Sherwood BMR.

“The information in these reports is very helpful as it allows us to assess when and where workers will be needed and plan ahead. Our goal is to sustain a skilled, specialized and experienced construction workforce.”

The construction labour force is estimated to rise by almost 400 workers from 2012 to 2020 in response to increased construction activity. In addition, new entrants will be required to replace the estimated 1,100 workers that are expected to retire. Industry will need to recruit 1,500 workers over the next decade to meet industry demand requirements.

“Recruiting new workers will be difficult in some years, especially with looming retirements, as well as competition from projects in other provinces and the potential impact of the federal shipbuilding contract in Halifax, Nova Scotia,” says Ross Barnes, General Manager of the Construction Association of PEI.

“Steady investment in apprenticeship, career promotion and recruiting that target youth, immigrants, women and other industries, is key to meeting our needs and sustaining our workforce,” he adds.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year scenario-based labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org this spring. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. The website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:

Ross Barnes
Construction Association of PEI
(902) 368-3303

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

New Brunswick construction industry prepares for next decade of building

March 27, 2012

MONCTON, NB – With careful planning, the New Brunswick construction industry should be able to draw on its own workforce to meet labour requirements for most of the next decade.

Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for New Brunswick
says the province came off a historic high level of construction activity, but residential activity has been trending down, government stimulus programs have ended, and several major non-residential projects are nearing completion.

The just-published Construction Sector Council (CSC) forecast stresses that even as overall construction activity slows, industry will still need to plan carefully to sustain all the systems necessary to support the construction workforce, including retention, career promotion and training.

“With stronger construction markets in other parts of the country, the challenge lies in keeping the skilled workers here when they are needed to replace retiring workers,” says Tim flood, President of John Flood and Sons (1961) Ltd.

Mining and other resource-related projects will be the main source of new jobs, but there will also be moderate increases in employment in the industrial, commercial and institutional sectors.

Those job openings compensate for the losses in engineering-related work caused by the completion of major projects and the end of government stimulus projects.

When it comes to housing, overall losses in employment reach almost 20 percent over the entire forecast period. The downward trend occurs mostly in new housing, while renovation and maintenance follow a gradual and steady increase in employment.

The industry’s labour force is estimated to decline by almost 2,700 workers from 2012 to 2020 as construction investment weakens. This decline will be offset by the expected retirement of 4,200 workers. Industry will still need to recruit more than 1,500 workers to replace retirees and sustain a skilled workforce.

“That means keeping apprenticeship, career promotion and skill upgrading on the front burner at all times”, says Gary Ritchie, President of the New Brunswick Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year scenario-based labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org this spring. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. The website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION –

Gary Ritchie
New Brunswick Provincial Building and Construction Trades Council
(506) 459-6049

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

New projects, outside competition and retirements impact demand for construction workers in Nova Scotia

March 27, 2012

HALIFAX, NS – The recent federal shipbuilding contract and other large non-residential projects are creating new opportunities for Nova Scotia’s construction industry.

Industry leaders are taking steps now to deal with new opportunities in some industrial and engineering-related trades, basing their plans on the Construction Sector Council’s (CSC) most recent forecast of labour supply and demand.

Moderate growth in non-residential construction increases employment over the near term driven by engineering, industrial, commercial and institutional activity. Work is underway or proposed on several major projects that will raise employment between 2012 and 2014. As these projects wind down, however, employment returns to current levels. The CSC’s report, Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for Nova Scotia, says the province’s construction labour force will decline by about 400 workers as overall activity slows across the outlook scenario from 2012 to 2020. But industry continues to face the pressures of an aging workforce. The CSC estimates that industry will need to replace more than 6,000 workers that are expected to retire over the next decade.

Industry must also prepare for the potential impact of the $25 billion federal shipbuilding contract awarded to the Halifax shipyards, and this may alter the labour market outlook for construction trades. While few details are yet available, several of the key trades in high demand for the shipbuilding contract are construction-related trades.

“The new projects combined with competition from outside the industry and province, as well as ongoing retirements is driving stakeholders to invest more in recruitment and training,” says Duncan Williams, President of the Construction Association of Nova Scotia. “We’re focusing our efforts on a variety of labour sources, including youth, women, other industries and immigrants.”

While there are employment opportunities in some markets, the job prospects in road, bridge and new residential construction are expected to be weak across the outlook scenario.

“Managing worker mobility will be key to meeting labour requirements,” says Allan Stapleton, President of the Nova Scotia Construction Labour Relations Association “Over the next few years, there will be opportunities for mobility between sectors of construction, and between provinces, as workers shift to where their skills are needed.”
 
The forecast report highlights the potential for workers on new residential projects shifting to renovations, residential workers seeking jobs on non-residential projects, and construction workers moving into and back from shipbuilding.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year scenario-based labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org this spring. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. The website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:

Duncan Williams
Construction Association of Nova Scotia
(902) 718-7796

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

Strong employment opportunities for construction workers in Newfoundland and Labrador

March 27, 2012

ST JOHN’S, NFLD – The construction workforce in Newfoundland and Labrador will swell over the next several years as major resource projects get underway.

Major projects in electric utilities, mining and offshore oil will be the key drivers of non-residential construction employment. Between 2012 and 2015, an estimated 2,200 new jobs will be created.

While the major industrial and engineering projects dominate the market, the forecast includes a moderate and steady growth in the commercial and institutional sectors across the scenario period. “Where these sectors hire the same key trades as the major industry projects, employers will face recruiting challenges and potential shortages over the near term”, says Rhonda Neary, President of the Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Association.

The data is from the latest forecast of labour supply and demand published by the Construction Sector Council (CSC): Construction Looking Forward, 2012 to 2020 Key Highlights for Newfoundland and Labrador.

“Our challenge will be to find enough skilled workers given the increase in construction activity and the large number of upcoming retirements,” adds Neary.

According to the report, an estimated 4,200 workers or 28 percent of the current workforce is expected to retire over the next decade.

“There will be plenty of job opportunities in the province,” says David Wade, Executive Director of the Newfoundland and Labrador Building and Construction Trades Council. “While employment demands for the current list of major projects is expected to peak in 2015, there are several large projects that are still under review, but not yet included in our analysis because of uncertainty around proposed schedules. The addition of these potential projects would alter the long-term market conditions and increase labour demand requirements as they come on stream later in the scenario.”

Following a decade of strong growth, residential construction spending and employment growth slows across the scenario period. The forecast shows some job losses in the later part of the scenario. “The residential construction industry is a combination of new home starts and renovation of existing homes. So the losses that may be experienced in the new home starts in this forecast scenario will be offset by renovation and maintenance work. Overall, residential construction in Newfoundland and Labrador will continue to be a strong contributor to the local economy,” says Victoria Belbin, Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Home Builders’ Association – Newfoundland and Labrador.

Each year, the CSC releases nine-year scenario-based labour forecasts following consultations with industry leaders, including owners, contractors and labour groups, as well as governments and educational institutions.

The national and regional reports will be available online at www.csc-ca.org this spring. Forecast data is also available at www.constructionforecasts.ca. The website allows for instant access to residential and non-residential construction investment data, as well as details on the supply and demand for more than 30 skilled trades and occupations over the next nine years – all broken down by province and region.

The Construction Sector Council is a national industry-led organization committed to the development of a highly skilled workforce that will support the future needs of Canada’s construction industry. It is funded by the Government of Canada’s Sector Council Program.

MORE INFORMATION:

Rhonda Neary
Newfoundland and Labrador Construction Association
(709) 699-5177

Rosemary Sparks
Construction Sector Council
(905) 852-9186

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